Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act advertising fraud rules

Read below to learn more about this topic.

Or, to receive a no cost phone consultation about what the Law Office of Paul DePetris might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris at .

The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD GENERAL ADVERTISING RULES

SUBCHAPTER 9. GENERAL ADVERTISING
13:45A-9.1 Definitions
The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following meanings, unless the context
clearly indicates otherwise.
“Advertisement” means any attempt by an advertiser, other than by use of a price tag, catalog or any offering for the sale
of a motor vehicle subject to the requirements of N.J.A.C. 13:45A-26A, to directly or indirectly induce the purchase or rental
of merchandise at retail, appearing in any newspaper, magazine, periodical, circular, in-store or out-of-store sign or other
written matter placed before the consuming public, or in any radio broadcast, television broadcast, electronic medium or
delivered to or through any computer.
“Advertiser” means any person as defined by N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(d) who in the ordinary course of business is engaged in the
sale or rental of merchandise at retail and who placed, either directly or through an advertising agency, an advertisement
before the public.
“Catalog” means a multi-page solicitation in which a seller offers goods for sale or rental for a seasonal or specified
period of time, from which consumers can order goods directly without going to the seller’s place of business. An advertising
circular, distributed through inclusion in a newspaper, representing a seller’s partial offering of goods for sale or rental
for a period of time not to exceed two weeks, shall not be considered a catalog.
“Closeout sale” means a sale in which an advertiser offers for sale at a reduced price items of merchandise remaining at
one or more specified locations which the advertiser will not have available for sale within a reasonable period of time after
all such items have been sold.
“Division” means the Division of Consumer Affairs.
“Factory outlet” means an establishment owned by a manufacturer that is used primarily to offer, at retail, the manufacturer’s
products directly to the consumer for his or her own use and not for resale.
“Fictitious former price” means an artificially inflated price for an item or items of merchandise established for the
purpose of enabling the advertiser to subsequently offer the item or items at a large reduction.
“Former price or price range” in a price reduction advertisement means an advertised price or price range for an item of
merchandise that has been offered or sold by the advertiser in his or her trade area or competitors in their trade area.
“Home appliance” means any electrical, mechanical or thermal article produced or distributed for sale to a consumer for
use in or around a permanent or temporary household or residence including, but not limited to, air conditioners, cameras,
computers, dehumidifiers, dishwashers, dryers, electric blankets, electronic games, fans, freezers, motorized kitchen aids,
ovens, radios, ranges, refrigerators, stereo equipment, televisions and washers.
“Merchandise” means any objects, wares, goods, commodities, services or anything offered directly or indirectly to the
public for sale or rental at retail.
“Multi-tiered pricing” means a form of offer where the price of merchandise or the extent of a discount is contingent
upon the consumer’s merchandise selections, such as the number of units purchased, the purchase of other merchandise
pursuant to the terms of the advertiser’s offer, or the total dollar amount of the consumer’s order, for example, “Buy two cans
of soda, get a third can at half price.”
“Percentage-off discount” means an offer to sell merchandise expressed in terms of a percentage reduction or range of
percentage reductions in price, such as “10% off” or “25% to 50% off.”
“Point of display” means a location within a retail establishment where an item of merchandise is displayed for the
purpose of selection by the consumer with the intention of purchase.
“Point of sale” means any location in a retail establishment where purchases of merchandise are totaled by a scanner and
payment is made by a consumer.
“Point of sale discount” means a price reduction which, although it is advertised or posted at the point of display, is
automatically applied to reduce the retail price of the merchandise at the time it is scanned for consumer purchase, or a price
reduction manually entered through a cash reduction or similar device, then scanned for consumer purchase.
“Price advertisement” means any advertisement in which a specific dollar price is stated with regard to specific advertised
merchandise.
“Price reduction advertisement” means an advertisement which in any way states or suggests directly or indirectly that
merchandise is being offered or made available for sale at a price less than that at which it has been routinely sold or offered
for sale in the past or at which it will be sold or offered for sale in the future. The following words and terms or their
substantial equivalent, when used in any advertisement except when used exclusively as part of the advertiser’s corporate,
partnership or trade name, shall be deemed to indicate a price reduction advertisement: sale, discount, special savings, price
cut, bargain, reduced, prices slashed, clearance, regularly, usually, cut rate, originally, formerly, warehouse or factory clearance,
buy one get one free, at cost, below cost, wholesale.
“Rain check” means a written statement issued by an advertiser allowing the purchase of designated merchandise at a
previously advertised price.
“Scanner” means an electronic system that employs a laser bar code reader to retrieve product identity, price and other
information stored in computer memory.
“Targeted discount” means a price reduction on merchandise which reduction is restricted to customers designated by
the advertiser, such as those who possess a card or other device bearing a scanner-readable code issued by the advertiser, a
particular type of credit card, or some other device which, when read by the scanner, shall apply the discount at the time of
purchase.
“Trade area” means that geographical area in which an advertiser solicits or makes a substantial number of sales.
13:45A-9.2 General advertising practices
(a) Without limiting the application of N.J.S.A. 56:8-1 et seq., the following practices shall be unlawful with respect to
all advertisements:
1. The failure of an advertiser to maintain and offer for immediate purchase advertised merchandise in a quantity
sufficient to meet reasonably anticipated consumer demand therefor. When an advertisement states a specific
period of time during which merchandise will be available for sale, a sufficient quantity of such merchandise
shall be made available to meet reasonably anticipated consumer demand during the stated period. When no
stated period appears in the advertisement, a sufficient quantity of merchandise shall be made available to meet
reasonably anticipated consumer demand during three consecutive business days commencing with the effective
date of the advertisement. The requirement of this subsection shall not be applicable to merchandise which
is advertised:
i. On an in-store sign only with no corresponding out-of-store sign;
ii. As being available in a specific quantity; or
iii. As being available in a “limited supply,” pursuant to a “closeout sale” or pursuant to a “clearance sale” if
such offering meets the definition of a closeout sale; or if represented to be permanently reduced.
2. The failure of an advertiser to specifically designate within an advertisement which merchandise items possess
special or limiting factors relating to price, quality, condition or availability. By way of illustration, and not by
limitation, the following shall be deemed violative of this subparagraph:
i. The failure to specifically designate which merchandise items are below cost, if any amount less than all
advertised items are below cost, when a statement of below cost sales is set forth in an advertisement;
ii. The failure to specifically designate which merchandise items, if any, are damaged or in any way less than
first quality condition;
iii. The failure to specifically designate merchandise as floor models, discontinued models or one of a kind,
when applicable;
iv. The failure to clearly designate or describe the retail outlets at which advertised merchandise will or will not
be available. Such information need not be disclosed on any in-store advertisement.
3. The failure to conspicuously post notice of advertised merchandise, on the business premises to which the
advertisement applies, in proximity to the advertised merchandise or at all entrances to the business premises.
Such notice may consist of a copy of the advertisement or may take the form of a tag attached to the merchandise
or any sign with such terms as “sale,” “as advertised,” “20% off.”
4. In any price advertisement in which a home appliance is offered for sale, the failure of an advertiser to disclose
the following information relating to the advertised merchandise: the manufacturer’s name or the merchandise
trade name, the model or series number and such other information as may be necessary to clearly delineate the
advertised item from other similar merchandise produced by the same manufacturer.
5. The use of any type, size, location, lighting, illustration, graphic depiction or color resulting in the obscuring of
any material fact.
6. The use of the terms “Public Notice,” “Public Sale” or words or terms of similar meaning in any advertisement
offering merchandise for sale, where such sale is not required by court order or by operation of law, other than
a sale conducted by an auctioneer on behalf of a non-business entity.
7. Describing the advertiser through the use of the terms “warehouse,” “factory outlet,” “discount,” “bargain,”
“clearance,” “liquidators,” “unclaimed freight,” or other words or terms of similar meaning, whether in the
advertiser’s corporate, partnership or trade name or otherwise, where such terms do not reflect a bona fide
description of the advertiser being described.
8. Whenever an advertiser provides a raincheck for an advertised item which is not available for immediate
purchase, the failure to:
i. Honor or satisfy such raincheck within 60 days of issuance unless an extension of such time period is agreed
to by the holder thereof; and
ii. Give written or telephonic notice to the holder thereof when the merchandise is available and hold such
merchandise for a reasonable time after giving such notice, for all merchandise with an advertised price
greater than $15 per unit; and
iii. Offer a raincheck to all customers who are unable, due to the unavailability thereof, to purchase the advertised
merchandise during the period of time during which the merchandise has been advertised as available
for sale.
9. The making of false or misleading representations of facts concerning the reasons for, existence or amounts of
price reductions, the nature of an offering or the quantity of advertised merchandise available for sale.
10. The failure of an advertiser to substantiate through documents, records or other written proof any claim made
regarding the safety, performance, availability, efficiency, quality or price of the advertised merchandise, nature
of the offering or quantity of advertised merchandise available for sale. Such records shall be made
available upon request for inspection by the Division or its designee at the advertiser’s regular place of business
or central office in New Jersey, or, at the advertiser’s option, the Division’s designated offices, for a period of 90
days following the effective date of the advertisement.
11. The use, directly or indirectly, of a comparison to a suggested retail price, inventory price, invoice price or
similar terms that directly or indirectly compare or suggest the comparison between the cost of supply and the
price at retail for the advertised merchandise.
12. Use of the term “cost,” “wholesale” or other similar terms to describe an advertised price where such price is
not equal to or less than the price per unit paid by the advertiser to the manufacturer or distributor of the
merchandise. In the computation of the price per unit of the advertised merchandise, freight may be included if
the advertiser pays for same and is not reimbursed therefore, but handling and all overhead or operating expenses
shall be excluded.
13:45A-9.3 Price reduction advertisements; merchandise advertised at a price of less than $100.00
(a) An advertiser offering a price reduction on merchandise at a price of less than $100.00 shall, in addition to complying
with the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.2:
1. State with specificity in any price reduction advertisement the period of time during which the price reduction
shall be applicable, unless that merchandise is advertised in the manner set forth in N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.2(a)1i
through iii;
2. Ensure that the amount of the price reduction is sufficiently large that the consumer, if he or she knew what the
former price was, would believe that a genuine bargain or saving was being offered; and
3. Comply with the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.4 if the advertisement makes reference to a former price or
price range; however, this requirement shall not apply to merchandise discount offers made in accordance with
N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.8.
13:45A-9.4 Price reduction advertisements; items of merchandise specifically advertised at a price of more
than $100.00
(a) An advertiser offering an item of merchandise specifically advertised for sale at a price of $100.00 or more shall, in
addition to complying with the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.2:
1. State the selling price or price range;
2. State the former price or price range or the amount of the reduction in dollars;
3. State with specificity in any price reduction advertisement the period of time during which the price reduction
shall be applicable, unless the merchandise is advertised in the manner set forth in N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.2(a)1i
through iii;
4. Set forth the former price or price range or the amount of reduction in dollars in close proximity to the selling
price or price range and the advertised item;
5. Set forth the basis upon which the former price or price range or the amount of reduction in dollars was established
in close proximity to the former price or price range of the advertised item. In this regard, terms such as
“comparable value,” “competitor’s price,” “our regular price,” or, words of similar import shall be used to
designate the basis for the former price; and
6. Set forth with specificity when in the remote past a former price of an item of merchandise was effective if it
was not actively or openly offered for sale within the advertiser’s trade area in the regular course of business
during at least 28 of the 90 days before the effective date of the advertisement. In this regard, when advertising
a seasonal sale, such as Christmas dishes, pool supplies, outdoor furniture, etc., actual dates, specific holidays
or terms such as “last season,” may be used to describe when the former price was used in the remote past.
(b) A former price or a selling price may be stated in terms of a price range when, and only when:
1. An advertiser operates more than one retail outlet at which advertised merchandise has been or will be available
for purchase at different prices in the ordinary course of business. In such case, the price range shall be based
upon the sales or offers of sale at the advertiser’s retail outlets; or
2. An advertiser advertises two or more items of comparable merchandise as available at reduced prices, in which
case the price range shall be based upon former or usual selling prices of the advertised products.
i. The following examples would comply with this paragraph: “Regular price $110 to $125--On sale for
$100"; “Brand X 19” color TV--Regularly $250 to $300. Now $150 to $200.”
13:45A-9.5 Price reduction advertisements; merchandise advertised as a savings of a percentage or a range
of percentages
(a) An advertiser offering merchandise for sale at a savings of a percentage or a range of percentages (such as “save 20%
or 20% to 50% off”) shall, in addition to complying with the provisions of N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.2:
1. State the minimum percentage reduction as conspicuously (such as the same size print) as the maximum percentage
reduction when applicable; and
2. Set forth the basis upon which the former price was established pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.6(b), in close
proximity to the percentage reduction. In this regard, terms such as “competitor’s price” or “our regular price”
or words of similar import shall be used to designate the basis for the former price.
(b) Percentage-off discounts made in accordance with N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.8 shall be exempt from the requirements of
(a) above.
13:45A-9.6 Pricing; prohibition on fictitious pricing and methods of substantiation
(a) An advertiser shall not use a fictitious former price. Use of a fictitious former price will be deemed to be a violation
of the Consumer Fraud Act.
(b) A former price or price range or the amount of reduction shall be deemed fictitious if it can not be substantiated,
based upon proof:
1. Of a substantial number of sales of the advertised merchandise, or comparable merchandise of like grade or
quality made within the advertiser’s trade area in the regular course of business at any time within the most
recent 60 days during which the advertised merchandise was available for sale prior to, or which were in fact
made in the first 60 days during which the advertised merchandise was available for sale following the effective
date of the advertisement;
2. That the advertised merchandise, or comparable merchandise of like grade or quality, was actively and openly
offered for sale at that price within the advertiser’s trade area in the regular course of business during at least 28
days of the most recent 90 days before or after the effective date of the advertisement; or
3. That the price does not exceed the supplier’s cost plus the usual and customary mark-up used by the advertising
merchant in the actual sale of the advertised merchandise or comparable merchandise of like grade or quality
in the recent regular course of business.
(c) If the former price specifically references a time in the remote past during which it was offered, it shall be deemed
fictitious unless substantiated pursuant to either (b)1 or 3 above.
(d) The following examples of fictitious pricing are provided for illustration only and are not intended to limit the types
of advertising the Division shall consider to be fictitious:
1. John Doe is a retailer of Brand X fountain pens which cost him $5.00 each. His usual markup is 50 percent over
cost. That is, his regular retail price is $7.50. In order subsequently to offer an unusual “bargain,” Doe
temporarily raises the price of Brand X pens to $10.00 each. In so doing, Doe realizes that he will only be able
to sell a few pens, if any, at this inflated price. But he does not care, because he intends to maintain that price
for only a few days. Then he “cuts” the artificially inflated price of $10.00 to the usual price--$7.50 at which
time he advertises: “Terrific Bargain: X Pens, Were $10, Now Only $7.50.” This is obviously a false claim.
The advertised “bargain” is not genuine.
2. Retailer Doe advertises Brand X pens as having a “Retail Price $15.00, My Price $7.50,” when, in fact, only a
few small suburban boutique-type stores in the area charge $15.00. All of the larger outlets, like retailer Doe’s,
located in and around the main shopping areas charge approximately $7.50. This advertisement would be
deceptive because the price charged by the small suburban boutique or specialty stores would have no real
18
significance to Doe’scustomers, to whom the advertisement of “Retail Value $15.00” would suggest a prevailing,
and not merely an isolated and unrepresentative price in the area in which they shop.
3. Retailer Doe advertises Brand X pen as “Comparable Value $15.00” when only a small number of unrepresentative
specialty stores in the trade area offer Brand Y, an essentially similar pen, for that price. This is a related
form of misleading advertising because the price of the comparable merchandise (that is, Brand Y), which is
cited for comparison is not representative of the price for Brand Y being charged by representative retail outlets
in the advertiser’s trade area.
13:45A-9.7 Application of regulation
(a) This subchapter shall apply to the following advertisements:
1. Any advertisement uttered, issued, printed, disseminated or distributed within this State concerning goods and
services advertised as available at locations exclusively within this State; and
2. Any advertisement, other than radio and television broadcasts, issued, printed, disseminated or distributed to
any substantial extent within this State concerning goods and services advertised as available at locations
within this State and outside this State; and
3. Any advertisement, other than radio and television broadcasts, issued, printed, disseminated or distributed
primarily within this State concerning goods and services advertised as available at locations exclusively outside
this State; and
4. Any radio and television broadcasts uttered, issued, disseminated or distributed primarily within this State and
outside this State, or at locations exclusively outside this State.
(b) An advertiser, a manufacturer, an advertising agency and the owner or publisher of a newspaper, magazine, periodical,
circular, billboard or radio or television station acting on behalf of an advertising seller shall be deemed an
advertiser within the meaning of this subchapter, when such entity prepares or places an advertisement for publication.
No such entity shall be liable for a violation of this subchapter when the entity reasonably relies upon data,
information or materials supplied by an advertising seller for whom the advertisement is prepared or placed or when
the violation is caused by an act, error or omission beyond the entity’s control, including but not limited to, the
post-publication performance of the advertising seller. Notwithstanding that an advertisement has been prepared or
placed for publication by one of the aforementioned entities, the advertiser on whose behalf such advertisement was
placed may be liable for any violation of this subchapter.
(c) An advertiser has no liability under this subchapter for a failure to comply with any requirement thereof if the
advertiser shows by a preponderance of evidence that failure to comply resulted from actions of persons other than
the advertiser which were not, or should not have been reasonably anticipated by the advertiser; or that such failure
was the result of a labor strike or a natural disaster such as, but not limited to, fires, floods and earthquakes.
(d) If any provisions of this subchapter or the application thereof to any person or circumstances is held unconstitutional
or beyond the statutory powers of the Attorney General, the remainder of this subchapter and the application
of such provisions to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected
13:45A-9.8 Retail discounts in scanner stores; percentage-off discounts; point-of-sale discounts; multi-tiered
pricing offers; targeted discounts
(a) Retail establishments which use scanners that have the capability of providing percentage-off discounts, and wish to
offer percentage-off discounts at the point of sale shall set forth the regular price and the price after any discounts are
taken relating to the merchandise purchased by the consumer on the register receipt given to the consumer at the
point of sale.
(b) An advertiser who offers a percentage-off discount is not required to disclose the basis of the percentage reduction or
the regular price or price range in an advertisement pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:45A-9.5 provided that:
1. The retail price per unit of merchandise is less than $100.00; and
2. The regular price and the price after any discounts are taken are set forth on the register receipt given to the
consumer at the point of sale.
(c) An advertiser may discount merchandise at the point of sale without marking the merchandise with the discounted
price provided that the following information is posted conspicuously in the form of a notice at the point of display:
1. A description of the merchandise or the range or category of merchandise and the price to which the discount
shall apply;
2. A notice that the discount will be taken at the time of purchase; and
3. The specific amount or type of discount applicable, such as “$10.00 off” or “25% off posted price.”
(d) Advertisements and point of display materials involving multi-tiered pricing offers made by advertisers shall contain
the following:
1. All retail prices or discounts comprising the offer and the types of purchases to which they apply, for example:
i. “Treefree Paper Towels--Get first roll at 79¢, 2nd roll at 69¢ and each additional roll at 59¢”;
ii. “Wonder Hot Dog Rolls--$1.09 only; 79¢ with purchase of Plochman’s Mustard”; and
2. Any limitations applicable to the offer, such as the type, brand or size of the merchandise or restrictions on the
number of units which may be purchased.
(e) Advertisements containing targeted discounts shall conspicuously state that the offer is limited to a certain category
of consumer and shall specifically identify those consumers. If the merchandise to be discounted is also being
advertised at a reduced price for all consumers, the advertisement shall clearly distinguish between the types of
offers made by the advertiser and identify those consumers who are entitled to each offer.
1. Any targeted discounts or pricing information posted at the point of display shall clearly and conspicuously
state that the offer is limited, and shall identify the customers who are entitled to take advantage of the offer.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
Website Builder