Law Office Of Paul DePetris
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How To Answer New Jersey Interrogatories

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The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

WHAT ARE NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES?
New Jersey interrogatories are written questions that ask information about the facts of your New Jersey case. New Jersey interrogatories must be answered in writing and the New Jersey interrogatory answers must include a New Jersey court affidavit or certification that swears that the New Jersey interrogatory answers are truthful. Plaintiffs and defendants in certain types of New Jersey court cases are allowed to serve New Jersey interrogatories on their New Jersey plaintiff opponents or New Jersey defendant opponents.

WHAT ARE NEW JERSEY AFFIDAVITS?
In New Jersey court, a New Jersey court affidavit is a statement signed by a person that states that they are swearing that the information contained in the affidavit (or in an attachment to the affidavit, such as New Jersey court interrogatory answers) is truthful. A New Jersey court affidavit is notarized by a notary public of the State of New Jersey.

WHAT ARE NEW JERSEY CERTIFICATIONS?
In New Jersey court, a New Jersey certification is a statement signed by a person that states that they are swearing that the information contained in the certification (or in an attachment to the certification, such as New Jersey court interrogatory answers) is truthful. Unlike New Jersey affidavits, certifications are not notarized by a notary public of the state of New Jersey.

HOW ARE NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES USED IN NEW JERSEY COURT?
In New Jersey court, New Jersey interrogatories are conclusively proven facts that can be used at your New Jersey court trial against the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant that provides the New Jersey interrogatory answers. In New Jersey court interrogatory answers must be completed very carefully. Otherwise, the New Jersey interrogatory answers could give the opposing New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant the information they need to beat the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants answering the New Jersey interrogatories in court. Many New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants fail to answer New Jersey interrogatories seriously and thereby lose their New Jersey court case. New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that fail to serve New Jersey interrogatories in New Jersey court are taking major risks in their New Jersey court case. New Jersey interrogatories allow New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants to find out important information about their New Jersey court opponent’s case before a New Jersey court trial. Without the information that New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants can get through New Jersey interrogatories, New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants could be going to a New Jersey court trial without knowing what the other New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant will say or do at the New Jersey court trial. Many New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants lose their New Jersey court trial because they don’t understand what they must do to prove their New Jersey court case. Many New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants think they just file a New Jersey court complaint or New Jersey court answer and then show up in New Jersey court with papers and tell their story. This is not always how New Jersey court trials work! Never assume you can just show up to New Jersey court with New Jersey case documents and use them to support the New Jersey trial of your New Jersey case or even refer to them at trial. While it is true that you must bring all New Jersey case documents, photographs, videos and other items with you to the New Jersey trial that are necessary to prove your New Jersey case (preferably originals), even if you bring such New Jersey case documents and items to New Jersey court, the New Jersey court may refuse to allow you to use them at your trial. New Jersey has published cases, laws, regulations, court rules and rules of evidence that are very tricky and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at trial. Accordingly, before trial, you must consult all of these rules to determine how you intend to get your New Jersey case documents and items into evidence or how to properly use them at trial. Hearsay rules of evidence are particularly troublesome and you should study them carefully before trial. For example, it is very common for courts to refuse to allow a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant to use or refer to New Jersey case documents or items that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey court judge tell New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or New Jersey case documents. Without the proper preparation, items and New Jersey case documents may never be considered by the New Jersey court. New Jersey written requests for information served and answered in advance of a New Jersey court trial are often useful tools to get the information needed before a New Jersey court trial to prove a case or a defense.

WHEN ARE NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES SENT TO NEW JERSEY PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY DEFENDANTS?
In New Jersey Law Division, except as otherwise ordered by the New Jersey court, New Jersey interrogatories may, without leave of the New Jersey court, be served upon the New Jersey plaintiff or answers demanded pursuant to the New Jersey court rules after commencement of the New Jersey case and served upon or demanded from any other New Jersey party with or after service of the New Jersey summons and New Jersey complaint upon that New Jersey party. Except as provided in the New Jersey court rules, initial New Jersey interrogatories shall be served by the New Jersey plaintiff as to each New Jersey defendant within 40 days after service of that New Jersey defendant's answer and each New Jersey defendant shall serve initial New Jersey interrogatories within said 40-day period.

WHEN ARE ANSWERS TO NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES DUE?
In New Jersey Law Division, except as otherwise provided by the New Jersey Court Rules, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant served with interrogatories shall serve New Jersey interrogatory answers thereto upon the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant propounding them within 60 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatories. For good cause shown the New Jersey court may enlarge or shorten such time upon the filing of a New Jersey motion on notice made within the 60-day period. New Jersey consent orders enlarging the time are prohibited. However, in all New Jersey cases seeking recovery for property damage to automobiles and in all New Jersey personal injury cases other than New Jersey wrongful death, New Jersey toxic torts, New Jersey cases involving issues of professional malpractice other than medical malpractice, and those New Jersey products liability cases either involving pharmaceuticals or giving rise to a toxic tort claim, the New Jersey plaintiff and New Jersey defendant shall be limited to the New Jersey interrogatories prescribed by Forms A, B and C of Appendix II, as appropriate, provided, however, that each New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant may propound ten supplemental New Jersey interrogatory questions, without subparts, without leave of the New Jersey court. Any additional New Jersey interrogatories shall be permitted only by the New Jersey court in its discretion on the filing of a New Jersey motion. A New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant served with a complaint in an action subject to uniform interrogatories as prescribed by the New Jersey court rules shall be deemed to have been simultaneously served with such interrogatories. The New Jersey defendant shall serve New Jersey interrogatory answers to the appropriate New Jersey uniform interrogatories within 60 days after service by that New Jersey defendant of the New Jersey answer to the New Jersey complaint. The New Jersey plaintiff in such an action shall be deemed to have been served with uniform interrogatories simultaneously with service of defendant's answer to the New Jersey lawsuit and shall serve New Jersey interrogatory answers to the New Jersey interrogatories within 30 days after service of the New Jersey answer to the New Jersey lawsuit. In all actions commenced prior to September 5, 2000, however, answers to uniform interrogatories shall be demanded by letter of demand served upon all adverse New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants within the time prescribed by the New Jersey court rules, and answers shall be served within the time prescribed by the New Jersey court rules. Do not confuse the date a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant receives the New Jersey interrogatories as the same as the date of service! The date of service is the date of their mailing. If the New Jersey interrogatories are dated, that date may be the date of mailing. If the New Jersey interrogatories are sent with a letter forwarding the New Jersey interrogatories, the date of that letter may be the date of service.

HOW ARE NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES ANSWERED?
New Jersey interrogatories must be answered in writing and the New Jersey interrogatory answers must include a New Jersey court affidavit or certification that swears that the New Jersey interrogatory answers are truthful. When answering New Jersey interrogatories, privileged information need not be disclosed provided the claim of privilege is made pursuant to the New Jersey court rules. Nor need information be disclosed if it is the subject of an identified protective order issued pursuant to the New Jersey court rules. Except as otherwise provided in the New Jersey Court Rules, every question served by a New Jersey uniform interrogatory question must be answered unless the New Jersey court has otherwise ordered. New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants in certain types of New Jersey court cases are allowed to serve New Jersey interrogatories on their New Jersey plaintiff opponents or New Jersey defendant opponents. Except as otherwise provided in the New Jersey court rules, New Jersey interrogatories shall be answered in writing under oath by the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant upon whom served, if an individual, or, if a public or private corporation, a partnership or association, or governmental agency, by an officer or agent who shall furnish all information available to the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant. If the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant is unavailable, the New Jersey interrogatory questions may be answered by an agent or authorized representative of the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant, including a liability carrier who is conducting the New Jersey defense, whose New Jersey interrogatory answers shall bind the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant shall furnish all information available to the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant and the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant's agents, employees, and New Jersey attorneys. The person answering the New Jersey interrogatory questions shall designate which of such information is not within the New Jersey interrogatory answerer's personal knowledge and as to that information shall state the name and address of every person from whom it was received, or, if the source of the information is documentary, a full description including the location thereof. Each New Jersey interrogatory question shall be answered separately, fully and responsively either in the space following the New Jersey interrogatory question or on separate pages. Except as otherwise provided by the New Jersey court rules, if in any New Jersey interrogatory question a copy of a paper is requested, the copy shall be annexed to the New Jersey interrogatory answer. If the New Jersey interrogatory question requests the name of an New Jersey expert witness or treating physician of the New Jersey answering party or a copy of the New Jersey expert witness’ or treating physician's report, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant shall comply with the requirements of the New Jersey court rules. The original of the New Jersey interrogatory answers shall be served upon the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the New Jersey interrogatories, who shall then serve a copy of the New Jersey interrogatories and New Jersey interrogatory answers upon each of the other New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants. New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants against whom default has been entered need not, however, be served, and New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants represented by the same New Jersey attorney need be served with one copy. When the New Jersey interrogatory answer may be derived or ascertained from or requires annexation of copies of the business records of the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant on whom the New Jersey interrogatory question has been served or from an examination, audit or inspection of such business records, or from a compilation abstract or summary based thereon, or from electronically stored information, and the burden of deriving or ascertaining the New Jersey answer is substantially the same for the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the New Jersey interrogatory question as for the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant served, it is a sufficient answer to such interrogatory to specify the records from which the New Jersey answer may be derived or ascertained and to afford to the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the New Jersey interrogatory question reasonable opportunity to examine, audit or inspect such records and to make copies, compilations, abstracts or summaries. A specification shall be in sufficient detail to permit the interrogating party to locate and to identify, as readily as can the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant served, the records from which the New Jersey answer may be ascertained.

WHAT ARE NEW JERSEY AFFIDAVITS?
In New Jersey court, a New Jersey court affidavit is a statement signed by a person that states that they are swearing that the information contained in the affidavit (or in an attachment to the affidavit, such as New Jersey court interrogatory answers) is truthful. A New Jersey court affidavit is notarized by a notary public of the State of New Jersey.

WHAT ARE NEW JERSEY CERTIFICATIONS?
In New Jersey court, a New Jersey certification is a statement signed by a person that states that they are swearing that the information contained in the certification (or in an attachment to the certification, such as New Jersey court interrogatory answers) is truthful. Unlike New Jersey affidavits, certifications are not notarized by a notary public of the state of New Jersey.

WHAT IF A NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORY QUESTION ASKS FOR NEW JERSEY EXPERT WITNESS INFORMATION?
The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant may through interrogatories require any other party to disclose the names and addresses of each person whom the other party expects to call at trial as an expert witness, including a treating physician who is expected to testify and, whether or not expected to testify, of an expert who has conducted an examination pursuant to the New Jersey Court Rules or to whom the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant making a claim for personal injury has voluntarily submitted for examination without court order. The interrogatories may also require, as provided by the New Jersey Court Rules, the furnishing of a copy of that person's report. Discovery of communications between an attorney and any expert retained or specially employed by that attorney is limited to facts and data considered by the expert in rendering the report. Except as otherwise expressly provided by the New Jersey Court Rules, all other communications between counsel and the expert constituting the collaborative process in preparation of the report, including all preliminary or draft reports produced during this process, shall be deemed trial preparation materials discoverable only as provided in the New Jersey Court Rules. If a New Jersey interrogatory requires a copy of the New Jersey expert report of an New Jersey expert witness or New Jersey treating or examining physician as set forth in the New Jersey Court Rules, the New Jersey answering New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant shall annex to the New Jersey interrogatory question an exact copy of the entire New Jersey expert report or reports rendered by the New Jersey expert witness or physician. The New Jersey expert report shall contain a complete statement of that persons opinions and the basis therefor; the facts and data considered in forming the opinions; the qualifications of the New Jersey witness, including a list of all publications authored by the New Jersey witness within the preceding ten years; and whether compensation has been or is to be paid for the New Jersey expert report and testimony and, if so, the terms of the compensation. If the New Jersey answer to an interrogatory requesting the name and report of the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant's New Jersey expert witness or treating physician indicates that the same will be supplied thereafter, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the interrogatory questions may, on notice, move for a New Jersey court order of the New Jersey court fixing a day certain for the furnishing of that information by the New Jersey answering party. Such order may further provide that an New Jersey expert witness or treating physician whose name or report is not so furnished shall not be permitted to testify at trial. Except as herein provided, the communications between counsel and New Jersey expert witness deemed New Jersey trial preparation materials pursuant to the New Jersey court rules may not be inquired into.

HOW DO I OBJECT TO A NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORY QUESTION?
The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant upon whom interrogatories are served who objects to any New Jersey interrogatory questions served therein may either answer the New Jersey interrogatory question by stating "The New Jersey interrogatory question is improper" or may, within 20 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatory questions, serve a notice of motion, to be brought on for hearing at the earliest possible time, to strike any question, setting out the grounds of objection. The New Jersey answering party shall make timely answer, however, to all questions to which no objection is made. Interrogatories not stricken shall be answered within such unexpired period of the 60 days prescribed by R. 4:17-4(b) as remained when the notice of motion was served or within such time as the New Jersey court directs. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the interrogatory questions of a question answered by a statement that it is improper may, within 20 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatory answers, serve a notice of motion to compel an answer to the New Jersey interrogatory question, and, if granted, the New Jersey interrogatory question shall be answered within such time as the New Jersey court directs. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant served with interrogatories requesting copies of papers who objects to the furnishing thereof shall, in lieu of complying with the request, either state with specificity the reasons for noncompliance or invite the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the interrogatory questions to inspect and copy the papers at a designated time and place. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving the interrogatory questions of a request for a copy of a paper which is not complied with, may, within 20 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatory answers, serve a notice of motion directing compliance with the request or for other appropriate relief. When answering New Jersey interrogatories, privileged information need not be disclosed provided the claim of privilege is made pursuant to the New Jersey court rules. Nor need information be disclosed if it is the subject of an identified protective order issued pursuant to the New Jersey court rules. Except as otherwise provided in the New Jersey Court Rules, every question served by a New Jersey uniform interrogatory question must be answered unless the New Jersey court has otherwise ordered. When a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant withholds information otherwise discoverable under these rules by claiming that it is privileged or subject to protection as trial preparation material, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant shall make the claim expressly and shall describe the nature of the documents, communications, or things not produced or disclosed in a manner that, without revealing information itself privileged or protected, will enable other parties to assess the applicability of the privilege or protection. If information is produced in New Jersey discovery that is subject to a claim of privilege or of protection as New Jersey trial preparation material, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant making the claim may notify any party that received the information of the claim and the basis for it. After being notified, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant must promptly return, sequester, or destroy the specified information and any copies it has and may not use or disclose the information until the claim is resolved. A receiving New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant may promptly present the information to the court under seal for a determination of the claim. If the receiving New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant disclosed the information before being notified, it must take reasonable efforts to retrieve it. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant producing the materials must preserve the information until the claim is resolved. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant need not provide discovery of electronically stored information from sources that the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant identifies as not reasonably accessible because of undue burden or cost. On a motion to compel discovery or for a protective order, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant from whom discovery is sought shall demonstrate that the information is not reasonably accessible because of undue burden or cost. If that showing is made, the court nevertheless may order discovery from such sources if the requesting party establishes good cause, considering the limitations of the New Jersey court rule. The court may specify conditions for the discovery.

WHAT DO I DO IF I RECEIVE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT MY NEW JERSEY CASE AFTER ANSWERING NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES OR I RECEIVE ANOTHER NEW JERSEY EXPERT REPORT?
Except as otherwise provided by the New Jersey court rules, if the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant who has furnished answers to interrogatories thereafter obtains information that renders such answers incomplete or inaccurate, amended answers shall be served not later than 20 days prior to the end of the discovery period, as fixed by the track assignment or subsequent order. Amendments may be allowed thereafter only if the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant seeking to amend certifies therein that the information requiring the amendment was not reasonably available or discoverable by the exercise of due diligence prior to the discovery end date. In the absence of said certification, the late amendment shall be disregarded by the New Jersey court and adverse New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants. Any challenge to the certification of due diligence will be deemed waived unless brought by way of motion on notice filed and served within 20 days after service of the amendment. Objections made thereafter shall not be entertained by the New Jersey court. All amendments to answers to interrogatories shall be binding on the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant submitting them. A certification of the amendments shall be furnished promptly to any other party so requesting.

IF I ANSWER NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES, SHOULD I GIVE ORIGINAL RECORDS, PHOTOGRAPHS OR OTHER ITEMS ABOUT MY CASE TO MY NEW JERSEY PLAINTIFF OPPONENTS OR NEW JERSEY DEFENDANT OPPONENTS?
When you answer New Jersey interrogatories, Never give any New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant, get rid of or give away any original records about your New Jersey case or about the facts of your New Jersey case (such as invoices, bills, receipts, photographs, plans, blueprints, reports that you received from police departments, etc.) – if you go to trial you shall need these New Jersey case documents and if you submit them to the New Jersey court before the New Jersey trial the New Jersey court may not give them back to you for use at your New Jersey court trial!!!! You never give originals to anyone before trial and you need to use originals at your New Jersey court trial!!! Keep originals for your records and to bring these items to any New Jersey court hearings.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A DEFENDANT IGNORES NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES?
If you ignore New Jersey interrogatories and you are the New Jersey defendant or a plaintiff facing a counterclaim, then the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant that serves them on you can ask to have any answer that you file with the New Jersey court “suppressed” or “stricken” or may ask the New Jersey court to “compel” you or force you to provide answers or face court penalties. If the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant requesting the In New Jersey interrogatory answers files the proper papers with the New Jersey court, this could eventually lead the requesting New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant to win their New Jersey court case, either by getting a money judgment in their favor.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A NEW JERSEY PLAINTIFF OR NEW JERSEY COUNTERCLAIMANT IGNORES NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES?
If you ignore New Jersey interrogatories and you are a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant with a New Jersey counterclaim, then the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant that serves them on you can ask to have any New Jersey complaint or New Jersey counterclaim that you file with the New Jersey court “dismissed” or may ask the New Jersey court to “compel” you or force you to provide answers or face court penalties. If the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant requesting the In New Jersey interrogatory answers files the proper papers with the New Jersey court, this could eventually lead the requesting New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant to win their New Jersey court case, by getting a lawsuit or New Jersey counterclaim forever dismissed.

WHAT HAPPENS IF NEW JERSEY INTERROGATROY ANSWERS ARE INCOMPLETE?
If New Jersey interrogatory answers are incomplete, the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant, upon reasonable notice to other New Jersey plaintiffs or New Jersey defendants and all persons affected thereby, may apply for a New Jersey court order compelling discovery. For example, The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving a New Jersey interrogatory question answered by a statement that it is improper may, within 20 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatory answers, serve a New Jersey notice of motion to compel an answer to the question, and, if granted, the question shall be answered within such time as the New Jersey court directs. The New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant serving a request for a copy of a paper which is not complied with, may, within 20 days after being served with the New Jersey interrogatory answers, serve a notice of motion directing compliance with the request or for other appropriate relief.

NEED HELP PREPARING NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORY ANSWERS?
If you were served with New Jersey interrogatories, the Law Office of Paul DePetris will prepare your New Jersey court paperwork for you for a one time flat fee. After you pay the fee and submit the necessary information to the firm, the New Jersey court paperwork shall be typed up and sent to you for you to send to your New Jersey plaintiff opponents or New Jersey defendant opponents. Don’t take a chance getting your New Jersey court complaint or New Jersey counterclaim dismissed or your New Jersey court answer suppressed and don’t rely upon legal advice from anyone other than an attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey! To get a quote to prepare your New Jersey court paperwork, call Paul DePetris at 609-714-2020 or email him.

NEED HELP PREPARING NEW JERSEY INTERROGATORIES?
If you want to try to be better prepared for a New Jersey trial or find out the reasons why a New Jersey plaintiff is suing you in New Jersey court or why a New Jersey defendant is defending against your New Jersey court lawsuit, the Law Office of Paul DePetris will prepare your New Jersey court paperwork for you for a one time flat fee. After you pay the fee and submit the necessary information to the Firm, the New Jersey court paperwork shall be typed up and sent to you for you to file. Don’t take a chance getting your New Jersey court complaint or New Jersey counterclaim dismissed or your New Jersey court answer suppressed and don’t rely upon legal advice from anyone other than an attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey! To get a quote to prepare your New Jersey court paperwork, call Paul DePetris at 609-714-2020 or email him.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
Atlantic County New Jersey Bergen County New Jersey Burlington County New Jersey Camden County New Jersey
Cape May County New Jersey Cumberland County New Jersey Essex County New Jersey Gloucester County New Jersey
Hudson County New Jersey Mercer County New Jersey Middlesex County New Jersey Monmouth County New Jersey
Morris County New Jersey Ocean County New Jersey Passaic County New Jersey Salem County New Jersey
Somerset County New Jersey Sussex County New Jersey Union County New Jersey Warren County New Jersey

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
Atlantic County New Jersey Court Bergen County New Jersey Court Burlington County New Jersey Court Camden County New Jersey Court
Cape May County New Jersey Court Cumberland County New Jersey Court Essex County New Jersey Court Gloucester County New Jersey Court
Hudson County New Jersey Court Hunterdon County New Jersey Court Mercer County New Jersey Court Middlesex County New Jersey Court
Monmouth County New Jersey Court Morris County New Jersey Court Ocean County New Jersey Court Passaic County New Jersey Court
Salem County New Jersey Court Somerset County New Jersey Court Sussex County New Jersey Court Union County New Jersey Court
Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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