Law Office Of Paul DePetris
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New Jersey Car Advertising Rules

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The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.


NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD CAR ADVERTISING PRACTICES RULES, ALSO KNOWN AS THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD MOTOR VEHICLE ADVERTISING PRACTICES RULES

SUBCHAPTER 26A. MOTOR VEHICLE ADVERTISING PRACTICES
13:45A-26A.1 Scope
Without limiting any other practices which may be unlawful under the Consumer Fraud Act, N.J.S.A. 56:8-1 et seq., the
rules contained in this subchapter set forth motor vehicle advertising practices which are prohibited as unlawful under the
Consumer Fraud Act; the rules also include mandatory disclosure in advertisements of certain information relating to advertised
motor vehicles as well as on-site disclosures relating to advertised motor vehicles.
13:45A-26A.2 Application
(a) These rules shall apply to the following advertisements:
1. Any advertisement, including radio and television broadcasts, uttered, issued, printed, disseminated, published,
circulated or distributed within this State concerning motor vehicles offered for sale or lease at locations exclusively
within this State; and
2. Any advertisement, including radio and television broadcasts, uttered, issued, printed, disseminated, published,
circulated or distributed to any substantial extent within this State concerning motor vehicles offered for sale or
lease at locations within this State and outside this State, or at locations exclusively outside the State.
13:45A-26A.3 Definitions
The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following meanings, unless the context
clearly indicates otherwise.
“Advertised motor vehicle” means any new or used motor vehicle offered for sale or lease and specifically identified by
an advertised price. With respect to an advertisement which offers a group of new or used vehicles for sale or lease covering
a specified price range (for example, “1995 Metros for sale-- $10,000 to 12,999,” or “Lease a new Olds for $298 a month and
up.”), the least expensive motor vehicle in that advertised range is considered to be an advertised motor vehicle.
“Advertised price” means the dollar amount required to purchase or lease a motor vehicle, advertised as:
1. The total price; or
2. The monthly payment price; or
3. The deferred payment price; or
4. A specific discount or savings on the manufacturer’s suggested retail price.
“Advertisement” means any advertisement as defined by N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(a) of any motor vehicle including any statement
appearing in a newspaper, periodical, pamphlet, circular, or other publication, paper, sign or radio or television broadcast
which offers a motor vehicle for sale or lease at retail.
“Advertiser” means any person as defined by N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(d) who in the ordinary course of business is engaged in the
sale, leasing or financing of motor vehicles at retail or who in the course of any 12 month period offers more than three motor
vehicles for sale or lease or who is engaged in the brokerage of motor vehicles whether for sale or lease and who causes an
advertisement to be made for the retail sale or lease of motor vehicles. An advertising agency and the owner or publisher of
a newspaper, magazine, periodical, circular, billboard or radio or television station acting on behalf of an advertiser shall be
deemed an advertiser within the meaning of this subchapter, when the agency or owner’s or publisher’s staff prepares and
places an advertisement for publication. The agency, owner, or publisher shall not be liable for a violation of this subchapter
when reasonably relying upon data, information or material supplied by the person for whom the advertisement is prepared
or placed or when the violation is caused by an act, error or omission beyond the preparer’s control, including but not limited
to, the post-publication performance of the person on whose behalf such advertisement was placed.
“Broker” means a person who in the course of any 12 month period arranges or offers to arrange the retail sale or lease
of more than three motor vehicles from the inventory of other business entities.
“Closed-end lease” means a lease in which the lessee is not responsible for the value of the motor vehicle at the end of the
lease term unless there is excessive damage, wear and tear, or mileage.
“Dealer” means any person who in the ordinary course of business is engaged in the sale or leasing of motor vehicles at
retail or who in the course of any 12-month period offers more than three motor vehicles for sale or lease at retail.
“Demo” means a motor vehicle used exclusively by a dealer or dealer’s employee that has never been titled and to which
the new vehicle warranty still applies.
“Dealer-installed option” means optional equipment installed by the dealer at an additional cost.
“Lease” means a contract for the use of a motor vehicle for a period of time exceeding four months whether or not the
lessee may become the owner of the motor vehicle at the expiration of the lease.
“Lessee” means a person as defined in the Consumer Fraud Act, N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(d), who leases a motor vehicle from a
broker or dealer.
“Open-end lease” means a lease in which the lessee may owe additional amounts that is, a “balloon” payment, depending
on the value of the motor vehicle at the end of the lease term.
“Monroney label” is the label required by Section 3 of the Automobile Information Disclosure Act, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1231-1233.
“Motor vehicle” means any vehicle driven otherwise than by muscular power, excepting such vehicles as those which run only upon rails or tracks.
“MSRP” means the manufacturer’s suggested retail price.
“Period of publication” means the time period between 48 hours prior to the date of first publication of an advertisement and midnight of the third business day following the date of final publication; in the case of a special offer, the period of
publication shall extend until midnight of the date the special offer ends.
“Person” means a person as defined in the Consumer Fraud Act, N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(d).
“Rebate” means any payment of money by the manufacturer to or on behalf of a consumer who has bought or leased a motor vehicle, whether called “rebate”, “factory rebate”, “cash back”, “money back”, or a term of similar import.
“Sale” means a sale as defined by N.J.S.A. 56:8-1(e) of any motor vehicle.
“Special offer” means any advertisement of a reduction from the usual selling price for an applicable time period, whether called “sale”, “sale days”, “bargain”, “bargain days”, “special offer”, “discount”, “reduction”, “clearance”, “prices
slashed”, “special savings”, or a term of similar import.
“Taxes, licensing costs and registration fees” means those usual taxes, charges and fees payable to or collected on behalf
of governmental agencies and necessary for the transfer of any interest in a motor vehicle or for the use of a motor vehicle.
“Used motor vehicle” means any motor vehicle with an odometer reading of greater than 1,000 miles, except for a
“demo”.
13:45A-26A.4 Bait and switch
(a) The following motor vehicle advertising practices constitute “bait and switch” and are prohibited and unlawful:
1. The advertisement of a motor vehicle as part of a plan or scheme not to sell or lease it or not to sell or lease it at the advertised price.
2. Without limiting other means of proof, the following shall be prima facie evidence of a plan or scheme not to sell or lease a motor vehicle as advertised or not to sell or lease it at the advertised price:
i. Refusal to show, display, sell, or lease the advertised motor vehicle in accordance with the terms of the
advertisement, unless the vehicle has been actually sold or leased during the period of publication; in that
case, the advertiser shall retain records of that sale or lease for 180 days following the date of the transaction, and shall make them available for inspection by the Division of Consumer Affairs.
ii. Accepting a deposit for an advertised motor vehicle, then switching the purchaser to a higher-priced motor
vehicle, except when the purchaser has initiated the switch as evidenced by a writing to that effect signed by the purchaser.
iii. The failure to make delivery of an advertised motor vehicle, then switching the purchaser to a higher-priced
motor vehicle; except when thepurchaser has initiated the switch as evidenced by a writing to that effect signed by the purchaser.
13:45A-26A.5 Advertisements; mandatory disclosure requirements in all advertisements for sale
(a) In any advertisement in which an advertiser offers a new motor vehicle for sale at an advertised price, the following
information must be included:
1. The advertiser’s business name and business address;
2. A statement that “price(s) include(s) all costs to be paid by a consumer, except for licensing costs, registration
fees, and taxes”. If this statement appears as a footnote, it must be set forth in at least 10 point type. For
purposes of this subsection, “all costs to be paid by a consumer” means manufacturer-installed options, freight,
transportation, shipping, dealer preparation, and any other costs to be borne by a consumer except licensing
costs, registration fees, and taxes;
3. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price as it appears on the Monroney label, clearly denominated by using
the abbreviation “MSRP”;
4. The year, make, model, and number of engine cylinders of the advertised motor vehicle;
5. Whether the transmission is automatic or manual; whether the brakes and steering mechanism are power or
manual; and whether the vehicle has air conditioning, unless those items are standard equipment on the advertised
motor vehicle. This provision shall not apply to advertisements for motorcycles;
6. The last eight digits of the vehicle identification number, preceded by the letters “VIN”. This provision shall
not apply to radio and television broadcasts, or to advertisements for motorcycles;
7. A list of any dealer installed options on the advertised motor vehicle and the retail price of each, as determined
by the dealer.
(b) In any advertisement offering for sale a used motor vehicle at an advertised price, the information described in (a)1,
2, 4, 5 and 6 above must be included, as well as the following additional information:
1. The actual odometer reading as of the date the advertisement is placed for publication; and
2. The nature of prior use unless previously and exclusively owned or leased by individuals for their personal use,
when such prior use is known or should have been known by the advertiser.
(c) In any advertisement offering a “demo” for sale, the information listed in (a) above must be included, as well as:
1. Identification as a “demo”; and
2. The actual odometer reading as of the date the advertisement is placed for publication.
(d) It shall be an unlawful practice to fail to include the information required by this section.
13:45A-26A.6 Advertisements: mandatory disclosure in advertisements for lease of a new or used motor vehicle
(a) In any advertisement offering a new or used motor vehicle for lease, at an advertised price, the following information
shall be included:
1. That the transaction advertised is a lease;
2. The amount of any payment required at the inception of the lease or that no payment is required if that is the
case;
3. The number, amounts, due dates or periods of scheduled payments and the total of such payments under the
lease;
4. A toll-free number that may be used by consumers to obtain the information required under (f) below; and
5. The business name and, if an individual dealer, the address of the advertiser.
(b) In all written advertisements the information required in (a) above shall be prominently displayed in at least 10 point
type and shall be easy to find, read and understand.
(c) If the advertiser elects to use a full disclosure format in a written advertisement, then the information in (f) below
shall be prominently displayed in at least 10 point type and must be easy to find, read and understand.
(d) An advertisement which is not in writing shall clearly and audibly state the information in (a) above at a decibel level
equal to the highest decibel level used in the advertisement and at a speed equal to or slower than any other statement
contained in the advertisement. In a television broadcast, the information shall be prominently and conspicuously
displayed for at least five continuous seconds for each model advertised.
(e) The toll free number required pursuant to (a)4 above shall be operational not later than the date on which the
advertisement is broadcast or published. The advertiser shall:
1. Maintain the toll free number for 48 hours after the last day of the advertisement;
2. Ensure that the toll free number is operational from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Monday through Saturday;
3. Provide the information required under (f) below in a clear and audible manner, to any person who calls the toll
free number; and
4. If requested, provide the information required under (f) below in written form to be mailed, postage paid, to the
consumer’s address.
(f) Information provided through the use of a toll free telephone number shall include:
1. The advertiser’s business name and address;
2. Identification of the transaction as a lease;
3. Whether or not the advertised price refers solely to a business lease;
4. Whether it is an open-end or closed-end lease;
5. The number, amounts, due dates or periods of scheduled payments and the total of such payments under the
lease;
6. All other itemized payments such as security deposits or capitalized cost reduction required at the initiation of
the lease;
7. The cost of the lease which shall include the sum of (f)5 and 6 above;
8. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price as it appears on the Monroney label; when given in writing to the
consumer, clearly denominated by using the abbreviation “MSRP”;
9. A statement that “price(s) include(s) all costs to be paid by the consumer, except for licensing, registration and
taxes.” When given in writing to the consumer, it must be set forth in at least 10 point type;
10. Whether the lessee has the option to purchase the advertised motor vehicle and at what price and time; the
method of determining the price may be substituted for disclosure of the price;
11. The amount (including termination charge, if any) or method of determining any liability imposed upon the
lessee at the end of the term and a statement that the lessee shall be liable for the difference, if any, between the
estimated value of the leased motor vehicle and its realized value at the end of the lease term, if the lessee has
such liability;
12. A statement of the items included as standard equipment on the advertised motor vehicle;
13. Whether the transmission is automatic or standard; whether the brakes and steering mechanism are power or
manual and whether the vehicle has air conditioning, unless such items are included under (f)12 above. This
provision shall not apply to motorcycles;
14. The year, make, model and number of engine cylinders of the advertised vehicle;
15. The last eight digits of the vehicle identification number or “VIN.” This provision shall not apply to motorcycles;
16. If the advertised vehicle is a used vehicle, the actual odometer reading at the date of placing the advertisement
for publication; and the nature of prior use, unless previously and exclusively owned or leased by individuals
for their personal use, when such use is known or should have been known by the advertiser; and
17. If the advertised vehicle is a “demonstration vehicle” or “demo,” identification of the vehicle as a “demonstration
vehicle” or “demo;” and the actual odometer reading at the date of placing the advertisement for publication.
(g) It shall be an unlawful practice to fail to include the information required by this section.
13:45A-26A.7 Unlawful advertising practices
(a) In any type of motor vehicle advertising, the following practices shall be unlawful:
1. The use of any type size, location, lighting, illustration, graphic depiction or color so as to obscure or make
misleading any material fact;
2. The setting forth of an advertised price which has been calculated by deducting a down payment, trade-in
allowance or any deductions other than a manufacturer’s rebate and dealer’s discount;
3. The setting forth of an advertised price which fails to disclose, adjacent to the advertised price, that it has been
calculated by deducting a manufacturer’s rebate or dealer’s discount;
4. The failure to state all disclaimers, qualifiers, or limitations that in fact limit, condition, or negate a purported
unconditional offer (such as a low APR or high trade-in amount), clearly and conspicuously, next to the offer
and not in a footnote identified by an asterisk. Such disclosure shall be made verbally in a radio or television
advertisement. Identical information pertaining to all motor vehicles in a group of advertised motor vehicles,
however, may appear in a footnote, provided the type is no smaller than 10 point;
5. The failure to state the applicable time period of any special offer, in at least 10-point type immediately adjacent
to the special offer, unless the special offer is a manufacturer’s program;
6. The use of the word “free” when describing equipment or other item(s) to be given to the purchaser or lessee of
a motor vehicle, if the “free” item has a value which has increased the advertised price. In using the word “free”
in advertising, the advertiser shall comply with the Federal Trade Commission Rule, 16 CFR § 251, and any
amendments thereto;
7. The failure to disclose that the motor vehicle had been previously damaged and that substantial repair or body
work has been performed on it when such prior repair or body work is known or should have been known by the
advertiser; for the purposes of this subsection, “substantial repair or body work” shall mean repair or body
work having a retail value of $1,000 or more;
8. The use of the terms “Public Notice”, “Public Sale”, “Liquidation”, “Liquidation Sale”, or terms of similar
import, where such sale is not required by court order or by operation of law or by impending cessation of the
advertiser’s business;
9. The use of terms such as “Authorized Sale”, “Authorized Distribution Center”, “Factory Outlet”, “Factory
Authorized Sale”, or other term(s) which imply that the advertiser has an exclusive or unique relationship with
the manufacturer;
10. The use, directly or indirectly, of a comparison to the dealer’s cost, inventory price, factory invoice, floor plan
balance, tissue, or terms of similar import; or the claim that the advertised price is “wholesale” or “at no
profit”;
11. The use of the terms “guaranteed discount”, “guaranteed lowest prices” or other term of similar import unless
the advertiser clearly and conspicuously discloses the manner in which the guarantee will be performed and any
conditions or limitations controlling such performance; this information shall be disclosed adjacent to the
claim and not in a footnote;
12. The use of the statement “We will beat your best deal”, or similar term or phrase if a consumer must produce a
contract that the consumer has signed with another dealer or lessor in order to receive the “better” deal;
13. The use of such terms or phrases as “lowest prices”, “lower prices than anyone else” or “our lowest prices of the
year”, or similar terms or phrases if such claim cannot be substantiated by the advertiser.
13:45A-26A.8 Certain credit and installment sale advertisements
(a) The following information must be stated in any credit and installment sale advertising. It must appear adjacent to
the description of the advertised motor vehicle and not in a footnote or headline unless the information is the same
for all motor vehicles advertised. If in a footnote, it must be in at least 10-point type. Failure to include this
information shall be an unlawful practice.
1. The total cost of the installment sale, which shall include the down payment or trade-in or rebate, if any, plus the
total of the scheduled periodic payments;
2. The annual percentage rate;
3. The monthly payment figure and the number of required payments; and
4. The amount of any down payment or trade-in required or a statement that none is required.
(b) The following motor vehicle advertising practices concerning credit and installment sale advertisements shall be
unlawful:
1. The advertising of credit, including but not limited to such terms as “easy credit” or “one-day credit”, other than
that actually provided by the advertiser on a regular basis in the ordinary course of business;
2. The use or statement of an installment payment on any basis other than a monthly basis.
13:45A-26A.9 On-site disclosures
(a) The following information relating to an advertised motor vehicle must be provided at the main entrance(s) to the
business premises where the motor vehicle is displayed or in proximity to the vehicle or on the vehicle itself:
1. A copy of any printed advertisement that quotes a price for the sale or lease of that vehicle; alternatively, a tag
may be attached to the motor vehicle(s) stating the advertised price as well as the other information required in
N.J.A.C. 13:45A-26A.5 or 26A.6.
2. A fuel economy label, if required by the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act, 15 U.S.C. § 2006;
and
3. The Used Car Buyers Guide, if required by the Federal Trade Commission’s Used Car Rule, 16 C.F.R. Part
455.2.
(b) A dealer shall not advertise a new motor vehicle which does not have the Monroney label, if required by the Automobile
Information Disclosure Act, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1231-1233.
(c) It shall be an unlawful practice to fail to comply with the disclosures required by this section.
13:45A-26A.10 Record of transactions
(a) An advertiser shall have a motor vehicle advertised for sale on premises and available for sale at the advertised price
during the period of publication, or a record of the sale of that vehicle at the advertised price or less during that
period. An advertiser shall have a motor vehicle advertised for lease available for lease at the advertised price during
the period of publication, or a record of the lease of that vehicle at the advertised price or less during that period.
Such record shall consist of all applicable advertisements and a copy of the executed contract with the purchaser or
lessee of the vehicle; this documentation shall be maintained for 180 days after the transaction and shall be made
available for inspection by the Division of Consumer Affairs.
(b) If the motor vehicle is sold or leased during the period of publication, the advertiser must so notify consumers who
inquire by telephone or in person.
(c) It shall be an unlawful practice to fail to comply with the requirements of this section.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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