Law Office Of Paul DePetris
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New Jersey Car Fraud Examples

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The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

COMPANY OPERATING CAR DEALERSHIPS IN NEW JERSEY WHICH WAS SUED BY NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR CONSUMER FRAUD AND USED CAR LEMON LAW VIOLATIONS AGREES TO PAY $450,000.00
The New Jersey Attorney General’s Office and New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs sued a company operating car dealerships in Camden County, alleging the company violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, New Jersey Motor Vehicle Advertising Regulations and New Jersey Used Car Lemon Law and New Jersey Used Car Lemon Law Regulations and a 2001 settlement agreement that the company entered into with the State. Foulke Management Corporation did business as “Cherry Hill Triplex” and operates Cherry Hill Dodge, Cherry Hill Jeep Eagle, Cherry Hill Kia, Cherry Hill Mitsubishi and Mt. Ephraim Chrysler/Dodge.

The New Jersey Attorney General alleged that Foulke Management Corporation engaged in a marketing campaign with the advertising pitches “$8,000 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE,” “no credit check” and “you instantly qualify, regardless of your credit.” The New Jersey Attorney General claimed “This company allegedly advertised great deals that, in reality, were not available at its dealerships” and that “This was a typical bait and switch operation. We will not tolerate such deceptive practices.” The New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs received over 100 consumer complaints from Cherry Hill Triplex customers to date. The New Jersey Consumer Affairs Director claimed that “These car dealerships promised to take the high road in dealing with customers but the volume of complaints we’ve received tell another story.” “We expect an open and honest transaction when a New Jersey consumer spends thousands of dollars on a new or used vehicle.”

According to the New Jersey Attorney General, Foulke Management Corporation committed the following acts at its dealerships:
• Not honoring a “guaranteed” ad offer of $8,000 for each trade-in vehicle;
• Advertising that a New Jersey consumer would qualify for credit, then failing to provide credit to the New Jersey consumer;
• Using “bait and switch” pricing practices by planning to sell motor vehicles at a price higher than the advertised price, failing to honor the advertised price and advertising a motor vehicle that was not for sale;
• Failing to honor the advertised sales and/or lease price of a motor vehicle;
• Misrepresenting the lowest available Annual Percentage Rate (APR) on consumer loans;
• Failing to disclose that the motor vehicle had previously been damaged and that substantial repair or body work had been performed;
• Failing to disclose to consumers prior to purchase or lease that a motor vehicle had been used as a rental vehicle;
• Failing to disclose, adjacent to the motor vehicle’s advertised price, that the price includes deductions for a manufacturer’s rebate and/or dealer’s discount;
• Otherwise using small print, graphic illustrations and location to obscure material facts in its advertisements;
• Failing to maintain copies of applicable advertisements within 180 days of a sale or lease transaction; and
• Failing to submit the required Used Car Lemon Law fees and documentation.

In 2001, under the Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with Consumer Affairs, the company agreed to pay a $40,000 penalty and to operate lawfully in the future.

After the New Jersey Attorney General filed suit in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Camden County, the company agreed to settle the case with the State. The company did not admit to any wrongdoing or liability. However, the company promised to pay $450,000 for consumer restitution, investigation costs and the State’s attorney’s fees. In addition, the company agreed to pay $300,000 in civil penalties, which were suspended. The company also agreed to honor its advertised credit and allowance offers and to clearly display the total sales prices on vehicles.

NEW JERSEY CAR DEALER COMMITS CONSUMER FRAUD BY CHARGING CONSUMER FOR PRE DELIVERY SERVICES AFTER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER REFUSED TO BUY THOSE SERVICES
A New Jersey car dealership, Garden State Auto Park, violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud when the New Jersey car dealership charged the New Jersey consumer for predelivery services such as rustproofing, undercoating, paint sealer and fabric guard, that the New Jersey consumer explicitly rejected and that were not disclosed on the car’s final sales agreement.

NEW JERSEY CAR DEALER VIOLATED NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT WHEN ADVERTISING NEW JERSEY CARS BELOW DEALER INVOICE
A New Jersey car dealership, Arrow Pontiac, Inc., violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act when it advertised New Jersey automobiles as being "priced well below dealer invoice."

NEW JERSEY DEALER VIOLATED NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT WITH A SIGN AND DRIVE LEASING PROGRAM
A New Jersey car dealership, Red Bank Volvo, Inc., violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act when it failed to include in its New Jersey advertisement a statement that a "sign and drive" leasing program was subject to a credit check, because the New Jersey car dealership failed to state all disclaimers, qualifiers or limitations that in fact limited, conditioned or negated a supposed unconditional offer clearly and conspicuously and next to the offer instead of in a footnote identified by an asterisk.

DEALER VIOLATED NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT BY PLACING USED AUTOMOBILE ADVERTISEMENT THROUGH ADVERTISING AGENCY
Fay American Jeep, Inc. and Arrel Datsun placed an advertisement through an advertising agency for the New Jersey sale of a used automobile which failed to disclose its bona fide odometer reading (mileage). The New Jersey Court explained that the mileage of a used car is critical to its sales value and that in New Jersey it is unlawful to misrepresent the mileage of a used car by changing the odometer so as to show lesser mileage. The New Jersey Court found that both dealerships and the advertising agency who placed the advertisement were guilty of violating the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act.

NEW JERSEY DEALER VIOLATED NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT BY ADVERTISING AUTOMOBILE AT THE WRONG PRICE
A New Jersey consumer appeared at Ocean Dodge in response to an advertisement in "The Auto Shopper" which advertised an automobile for sale at $4,985. The New Jersey consumer and a representative of the New Jersey car dealership negotiated the New Jersey sale of the New Jersey automobile for a purchase price of $2,985, plus two trade-in vehicles and the New Jersey consumer signed a written agreement for the purchase price and the trade-ins and paid a $30 deposit. The New Jersey car dealership’s representative did not sign the agreement. When the New Jersey consumer returned to the New Jersey car dealership with her trade-ins the New Jersey consumer was informed that there had been a mistake in the advertisement and that the price was not $4,985 as advertised but was $7,165. The New Jersey car dealership’s representative stated that the van could not be sold for the advertised price of $4,985 and further, that the New Jersey consumer’s trade-ins were unsatisfactory. The parties attempted re-negotiation of the New Jersey sale for a price of $5,695 without trade-ins but the agreement was not finalized because the New Jersey consumer refused to sign a release as to the New Jersey car dealership’s potential liability for the erroneous advertising. The New Jersey car dealership tried to claim that they made a simple advertising error but the New Jersey Court didn’t buy it, especially since there was a significant ($2,180) disparity in the price written up by the New Jersey car dealership’s representative in the original agreement, $4,985, and the actual price of $7,165. The New Jersey Court determined that the New Jersey car dealership engaged in a plan or scheme not to sell a motor vehicle as advertised or not to sell it at the advertised price.

USED CAR DEALER VIOLATED NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT BY MISSTATING THE VEHICLE’S MILEAGE AND MISREPRESENTING THE NEW JERSEY SALE AS ONE BY AN INDIVIDUAL RATHER THAN BY A DEALER
Enterprise Motors, Inc. advertised a used 1996 Volkswagen Jetta without listing Enterprise as the seller and disguised the New Jersey sale as one by an individual occurring at the front yard of a house instead of through an automotive dealership. The advertisement did not refer to Enterprise or indicate that the New Jersey sale was by a dealer and stated that the Jetta had 42,000 miles and was listed at $4,300. But when the New Jersey consumer went to the house to inspect the car, he was told that there was a typo in the advertisement and that the vehicle had 65,000 miles instead of 42,000. Also, the New Jersey consumer was told he could not test drive the car because it had no license plates, but he was assured that it was in good running order. The New Jersey consumer was never told that the car was being sold by used car dealers. After the car was delivered to the New Jersey consumer, he discovered a transmission problem and called the person from whom he took delivery and the New Jersey consumer was instructed to take it to a person’s home. The New Jersey consumer did so and about a week later, when the New Jersey consumer drove by the home, the Jetta was no longer there and he was told that the Jetta had been towed to a dealer for repair. The New Jersey consumer then learned the car was not at the New Jersey dealer's, but was at a transmission repair shop, whereupon the New Jersey consumer had the vehicle towed from that repair shop to a shop of his choice, which performed $2,332 in repairs to the vehicle. The New Jersey trial judge found that the the New Jersey defendants' testimony lacked credibility and concluded that the New Jersey defendants violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, specifically the Administrative Rules of the Division of Consumer Affairs applying to sales of automobiles by dealers, and the New Jersey Administrative Code governing advertisements for the New Jersey sale of motor vehicles. The New Jersey trial judge awarded New Jersey Consumer Fraud plaintiff treble damages pursuant to the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act and awarded the New Jersey consumer $12,478.55 in New Jersey attorney’s fees and New Jersey court costs. On appeal, the New Jersey appeals court confirmed the entry of judgment against the New Jersey dealer.

IF I AM A NEW JERSEY VICTIM OF NEW JERSEY CAR SALES FRAUD, CAN I DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT?
Whenever there is a fraud in the execution or consideration of a New Jersey contract, the New Jersey car sales fraud victim defrauded at any time thereafter may institute a New Jersey lawsuit to recover the money owing on such New Jersey contract although, by its terms, the debt contracted or the money secured to be paid thereby is not then due or payable; and the person defrauded may, upon discovery of the fraud, either rescind the New Jersey contract entirely and recover the money or property obtained by the fraud, or, sue on the New Jersey contract to recover thereon.

In certain situations, a New Jersey plaintiff could assert that, since the New Jersey contract was the product of fraud, a New Jersey plaintiff is entitled to rescind the New Jersey contract and/or to recover the money and/or lien on property obtained under same.

New Jersey contract rescission is the equivalent of New Jersey contract cancellation. It is an equitable remedy which is only available in limited circumstances. Aside from situations where parties consent to New Jersey contract rescission, New Jersey contracts may normally only be rescinded where there is either original invalidity, fraud, failure of consideration, a material breach or default. Even where grounds for New Jersey contract rescission exist, the remedy is discretionary in nature. New Jersey contract rescission will not be granted where the party seeking same has not acted within a reasonable time or where substantial performance has already occurred. Indeed, delay in the rescission of a New Jersey contract is evidence of an election to treat a New Jersey contract as valid. However, the duty to rescind a New Jersey contract does not first arise until the party seeking New Jersey contract rescission discovers the grounds for same. To grant New Jersey contract rescission, a New Jersey court must be able to return the parties to their position before they entered into the New Jersey contract. Accordingly, a party cannot usually simply rescind a New Jersey contract and at the same time keep possession of goods or services received under the New Jersey contract. To complete a New Jersey contract rescission following partial performance, the party seeking to rescind the New Jersey contract must return or tender the consideration previously received. New Jersey contracts are subject to rescission where they are obtained by fraud. Indeed, the very existence of a fraudulently procured New Jersey contract causes damage, so that where fraud is found, damage may be presumed. In the absence of actual fraud, undue influence or misrepresentation, New Jersey contract rescission will not be permitted.

A unilateral mistake of a fact unknown to the other party to a New Jersey contract is not ordinarily grounds for New Jersey contract rescission. To qualify for such relief, a party must show special circumstances justifying a departure from the generally controlling principle that parties are bound by the New Jersey contracts they make for themselves. Accordingly, the circumstances providing for New Jersey contract rescission due to a unilateral mistake fact are: [1] the mistake is of such a great consequence that to enforce the New Jersey contract as actually made would be unconscionable; [2] the matter as to which the mistake was made must relate to the material feature of the New Jersey contract; the mistake must have occurred notwithstanding the exercise of reasonable care by the party making the mistake; and [4] the requested New Jersey contract rescission cannot cause serious prejudice to the other party, except for loss of bargain.

HOW DO I PROVE FRAUD IN A NEW JERSEY CONTRACT CASE?
At common law, there are two types of fraud: equitable and legal. To prove a claim for New Jersey common law equitable fraud, a New Jersey plaintiff must show the following:

• a material misrepresentation of a presently existing or past fact;

• made with the intent that a New Jersey plaintiff rely upon it; and

• detrimental reliance by a New Jersey plaintiff.

Even an innocent misrepresentation can constitute New Jersey equitable fraud justifying rescission of a New Jersey contract. But the only remedy available for New Jersey equitable fraud is equitable in nature: rescission or reformation of the New Jersey contract.

To prove a claim for New Jersey common law legal fraud, a New Jersey plaintiff must show the following:

• a material misrepresentation of a presently existing or past fact;

• knowledge or belief by a New Jersey defendant of its falsity;

• made with the intent to mislead the a New Jersey plaintiff;

• that such misrepresentation was justifiably relied upon by a New Jersey plaintiff; and

• that a New Jersey plaintiff sustained damages therfrom.

WHAT IS THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
The New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act is a law that seeks to stop the perpetration of fraud upon consumers. The New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act:
• Was enacted 1960.
• Eradicates fraud in the marketplace.
• Requires merchants to make disclosures.
• Is liberally construed to accomplish objectives.
• Compensates victim for actual losses.
• Promotes truth & fair dealing in marketplace.
• Punishes wrongdoers.
• can be raised in complaint or counterclaim & as affirmative defense.


The New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act prohibits certain conduct in connection with the sale or advertisement of merchandise or real estate and declares the following as unlawful practices: the act, use or employment by any person of any unconscionable commercial practice, deception, fraud, false pretense, false promise, misrepresentation or the knowing concealment, suppression or omission of any material fact with intent that others rely upon such concealment, suppression or omission in connection with the sale or advertisement of any merchandise or real estate, or with the subsequent performance of such person as aforesaid, whether or not any person has in fact been misled, deceived or damaged thereby.

The purpose of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act is to protect the public from sharp practices and dealings in the marketing of merchandise and real estate which could victimize the consumer by luring the consumer into a purchase through fraudulent, deceptive or other similar kinds of selling or advertising practices. The New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act is remedial legislation and should be construed liberally in favor of New Jersey's consumers.

There are 3 types of New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act liability:
• Per se violations
• Violations of specific subsections of statute
• Violations of administrative code
• Imposes strict liability upon the offending party.
• Affirmative acts
• unconscionable commercial practice;
• deception, fraud;
• false pretense;
• false promise; &
• Misrepresentation.
• Intent unnecessary
• Knowing, concealment, suppression, or omission of any material fact with intent that others rely thereon

Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, unconscionable conduct implies a lack of good faith, honesty or fair dealing. A simple breach of warranty or breach of New Jersey contract is not automatically unconscionable conduct in violation of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act. If a New Jersey plaintiff proceeds under the first prong of section 2 of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act – trying to prove an affirmative act violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act and relying on fraud as the unconscionable conduct, a New Jersey plaintiff must show that the fraudulent conduct of the defendant is unconscionable.

If a New Jersey plaintiff proceed under the second prong of section 2 of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act based upon a New Jersey plaintiff’ allegations that the defendant knowingly concealed information from a New Jersey plaintiff, a New Jersey plaintiff must show that the concealment was knowing and that it was made with the intent to induce a New Jersey plaintiff’ entering into the new mortgage. A simple erroneous statement by a party will not constitute a violation of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act unless it is an unconscionable practice under the first prong of section 2 of the statute.

As to defenses, subjective good faith of a merchant is not a defense under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act. In order to defend a claim under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, the merchant must show that he did not engage in unconscionable conduct in the sale of financing and that he did not make a knowing concealment, suppression or omission of any material fact with the intent to induce the purchase of the financing. Importantly, the burden of proof still rests with a New Jersey plaintiff, so that a New Jersey plaintiff must prove the elements under either prong of section 2 of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act.

ARE NEW JERSEY CONTRACTS THAT VIOLATE THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT ABLE TO BE CANCELLED?
• New Jersey contracts that violate the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act and New Jersey debts that are caused by violations of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act may be cancelled by a New Jersey court. Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, fraudulent debts are subject to cancellation via the equitable relief afforded to consumer fraud victims.
• If a merchant violates the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act so as to render the contract unenforceable, the merchant is typically precluded from recovering any profit for the services rendered & instead, might only recover via quantum meruit, if at all.
• Even recovery via quantum meruit is questionable, as those who commit consumer fraud should not profit from their misconduct.
• Before filing suit on behalf of a merchant seeking to collect debts that may be the product of consumer fraud, attorneys should warn their clients in writing of the possibility that, if the debt is found to be the product of consumer fraud, the suit may result in their:
o recovering nothing or far less than the amount sought;
o facing a judgment for their customer’s fees & costs in defending the collection action, regardless of proof of any ascertainable loss ; &
o Facing treble damages for causally related ascertainable loss.

WHAT ARE EXAMPLES OF NEW JERSEY DEBTS THAT ARE NOT ABLE TO BE COLLECTED BECAUSE THE BUSINESS OWED THE DEBT VIOLATED THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
The following are some examples of New Jersey debts that are not able to be collected because the business owed the debt violated the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act:
• Temporary help service firm not registered as a temporary help service firm with the Attorney General, sued another temporary help service firm for breach of contract for failure to pay for the first firm’s subcontractors’ services.
• NJ corporation recruiting & placing temporary computer consultants which was not registered as a temporary help service firm with the Attorney General, entered into an employment agreement with a computer consultant & sued him when he left the job.
• Mechanic’s efforts to collect on an outstanding bill via a counterclaim. Notwithstanding complete good-faith in performance, mechanic committed per se New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act violations of the automotive repair regulations. mechanic’s efforts to collect on an outstanding bill via a counterclaim. Notwithstanding his being an impressive witness & showing complete good-faith in the performance of the parties’ agreement, the mechanic committed per se New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act violations of the automotive repair regulations & the customer recovered treble damages, fees & costs.
• Unlicensed landscape irrigation contractor sued to collect an unpaid bill for a sprinkling system. The collection complaint was dismissed & the customer obtained a refund & an award of fees & costs.
• Owner of cleaning & restoration franchise specializing in mitigating damage following a fire or flood filed a collection action. Plaintiff’s failure to provide a written estimate & obtain a written authorization placed the cost of his services in doubt.


NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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