Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

New Jersey Consumer Fraud Facts

Read below to learn more about this topic.

Or, to receive a no cost phone consultation about what the Law Office of Paul DePetris might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris at paul@newjerseylemon.com.

The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT FACTS

WHAT IS THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Many of us have heard the Latin phrase caveat emptor: “let the buyer beware.” That statement allows little relief to a New Jersey consumer. That statement does not reflect current law in New Jersey. Here, we have a more ethical approach in business dealings with one another. Therefore, each of us may rely on representations made by another in a New Jersey business transaction. This approach is reflected in a New Jersey law, The New Jersey consumer fraud Act.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD CLAIMS?
There are three possible bases for responsibility under the New Jersey consumer fraud act. Two New Jersey consumer fraud violations are violations of section 2 of the New Jersey consumer fraud act; the third New Jersey consumer fraud violation is derived from either specific-situation New Jersey law violations or New Jersey consumer fraud regulation violations. The New Jersey consumer fraud act itself declares two general categories of conduct as unlawful. The first category of New Jersey consumer fraud act violations makes “any unconscionable commercial practice, deception, fraud, false pretense, false promise or misrepresentation” unlawful. These are considered affirmative acts. The second category of New Jersey consumer fraud act violations involves the “knowing concealment, suppression or omission of any material fact.” These are considered conduct by omission. The third basis for responsibility under the New Jersey consumer fraud act involves either a specific-situation New Jersey law or administrative regulations enacted to interpret the New Jersey consumer fraud act itself. Such New Jersey law and regulations define specific conduct prohibited by law.

WHAT IS MERCHANDISE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey consumer fraud act, the term “merchandise” includes any objects, goods, commodities, services or anything offered directly or indirectly to the public for sale. “Merchandise” does not include “securities”. The New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act probably does not apply to the sale of a New Jersey business.

WHO IS A PERSON UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, a “person” includes not only a human being or his or her legal representative but also a partnership, corporation, company, trust, business entity, association as well as his or her agent, employee, salesperson, partner, officer, director, member, stockholder, associate, trustee or beneficiary of a trust.

WHAT IS A SALE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, a “sale” includes transfer of ownership; rental; distribution; offer to sell, rent, or distribute; and attempt to sell, rent or distribute, either directly or indirectly.

WHAT IS AN ADVERTISEMENT UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, an “advertisement” is a notice designed to attract public attention. Modes of communication include the attempt, directly or indirectly, by publication, dissemination, solicitation, endorsement, circulation or in any way to induce any person to enter or not enter into an obligation, acquire any title or interest in any merchandise, increase the consumption of any merchandise or make any loan.

WHAT IS REAL ESTATE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, “real estate” is land and, if there is an improvement on the land, that improvement as well.

WHAT ARE SECTION 2 NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD VIOLATIONS?
Section 2 of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act declares that “any unconscionable commercial practice, deception, fraud, false pretense, false promise [or] misrepresentation” is an unlawful practice. Section 2 of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act also makes unlawful a “knowing concealment, suppression or omission of any material fact” under the New Jersey consumer fraud act.

WHAT IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACT UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
The first category of New Jersey consumer fraud act violations makes “any unconscionable commercial practice, deception, fraud, false pretense, false promise or misrepresentation” unlawful. These are considered affirmative acts. Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, an “affirmative act” is something done voluntarily by a person. The New Jersey consumer fraud act may be physical but also may be any steps taken voluntarily by a person to advance a plan or design or to accomplish a purpose.

WHAT IS AN UNCONSCIONABLE COMMERCIAL PRACTICE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, an “unconscionable commercial practice” is an activity which is basically unfair or unjust which materially departs from standards of good faith, honesty in fact and fair dealing in the public marketplace. To be unconscionable, there must be factual dishonesty and a lack of fair dealing.

WHAT IS DECEPTION UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, “deception” is conduct or advertisement which is misleading to an average consumer to the extent that it is capable of, and likely to, mislead an average consumer. It does not matter that at a later time it could have been explained to a more knowledgeable and inquisitive consumer. It does not matter whether the conduct or advertisement actually have misled New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiffs. The fact that New Jersey consumer fraud defendants may have acted in good faith is irrelevant. It is the capacity to mislead that is important.

WHAT IS FRAUD UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, “Fraud” is a perversion of the truth, a misstatement or a falsehood communicated to another person creating the possibility that that other person will be cheated.

WHAT IS FALSE PRETENSE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, “false pretense” is an untruth knowingly expressed by a wrongdoer.

WHAT IS A FALSE PROMISE UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, “false promise” is an untrue commitment or pledge, communicated to another person, to create the possibility that that other person will be misled.

WHAT IS A MISREPRESENTATION UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, a “misrepresentation” is an untrue statement made about a fact which is important or significant to the sale or advertisement, and is communicated to another person to create the possibility that other person will be misled. A “misrepresentation” is a statement made to deceive or mislead.

PROOF OF DECEPTION OR INTENT NOT ALWAYS NECESSARY TO PROVE A NEW JERSEY AFFIRMATIVE ACT CONSUMER FRAUD CASE
It is not always necessary for liability under the New Jersey consumer fraud act that a person actually be misled or deceived by another’s conduct. It is not necessary for a New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff to show that the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant intended that his or her or its conduct should deceive. What is important is that the affirmative act must have had the potential to mislead or deceive when it was performed. The capacity to mislead is the prime ingredient of an affirmative New Jersey consumer fraud act unlawful practice. Intent is not an essential element. New Jersey consumer fraud consisting of an affirmative act does not require a showing of intent.

WHAT IF THE PRICE CHARGED FOR THE PRODUCT IS EXCESSIVE?
The price charged is only one factor in the New Jersey court’s consideration. For example, if the New Jersey court finds that the price is grossly excessive in relation to the New Jersey seller’s costs and, as well, the goods sold have little or no value to the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiffs for the purpose for which the New Jersey plaintiffs were persuaded to buy the goods and which it appeared they would serve, the price paid by the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiffs becomes one factor relevant to weighing the wrong which the New Jersey consumer fraud act seeks to prevent and which it prohibits.

WHAT IS AN OMISSION UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
The second category of New Jersey consumer fraud act violations involves the “knowing concealment, suppression or omission of any material fact.” These are considered conduct by omission. Under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, an “omission” is neglecting to perform what the law requires. Liability must be imposed for such inaction depending on whether there is a duty to act under the circumstances. In a New Jersey consumer fraud knowing omission case, the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff claims that the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant knowingly concealed, hid or suppressed, kept something from being known or omitted, or left out or did not mention an important or significant fact purposely or with the intent that others would rely on that concealment or suppression or omission in connection with the sale or advertisement of any merchandise or real estate, how the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant would act or perform after an agreement to buy was made or how the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff responded to or answered the advertisement.

WHAT IS ACTING KNOWINGLY UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
A New Jersey consumer fraud defendant acts “knowingly” if he or she is aware that his or her conduct is of a nature that it is practically certain that his or her conduct will cause a particular result. A New Jersey consumer fraud defendant acts with knowledge, consciously, intelligently, willfully or intentionally.

WHAT IS TO CONCEAL UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
To “conceal” is to hide, secrete, or withhold something from the knowledge of others or to hide from observation, cover or keep from sight or prevent discovery of. “Concealment” is a withholding of something which one is bound or has a duty to reveal so that the one en itled to be informed will remain in ignorance.

WHAT IS TO SUPPRESS UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
To “suppress” is to put a stop to a thing actually existing, to prohibit or put down, or to prevent, subdue, or end by force. “Suppression” is the conscious effort to control or conceal unacceptable impulses, thought, feelings or acts.

WHAT IS ACTING PURPOSELY UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
A New Jersey consumer fraud defendant acts “purposely” if it is his or her conscious object to engage in conduct that of a certain nature or cause a particular result and he or she is aware of hopes or believes that the attendant circumstances exist.

WHAT IS INTENT UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
“Intent” is a design, resolve, or determination with which a New Jersey consumer fraud defendant acts. It refers only to the state of mind existing when an act is done or omitted. It is not necessary that any person be, in fact, misled or deceived by another’s conduct. What is important is that New Jersey consumer fraud defendant must have meant to mislead or deceive when he or she or it or they acted. The fact that New Jersey consumer fraud defendant acted knowingly or with intent is an essential element of acts of omission under the New Jersey consumer fraud act. Knowledge or intent must be shown. Where the alleged New Jersey consumer fraud can be viewed as either an omission or an affirmative act, the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant is liable for the conduct as an omission only where New Jersey consumer fraud defendant committed a New Jersey consumer fraud by omission and intent is shown.

WHAT IF THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD DEFENDANT IS THE OWNER OR PUBLISHER OF THE NEWSPAPER OR MAGAZINE OR PUBLICATION OR PRINTED MATTER IN WHICH THE ADVERTISEMENT APPEARED OR OWNER OR OPERATOR OF THE RADIO OR TELEVISION STATION ON WHICH THE ADVERTISEMENT APPEARED AND HAD NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE NEW JERSEY ADVERTISER’S INTENT, DESIGN OR PURPOSE?
If a New Jersey consumer fraud defendant says that it is the owner or publisher of the newspaper or magazine or publication or printed matter in which the advertisement appeared or the owner or operator of the radio or television station on which the advertisement appeared and that the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant, he or she or it had no knowledge of the intent, design or purpose of the New Jersey advertiser, the burden of proving this lack of knowledge by a preponderance of the evidence rests with the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant. If the New Jersey court finds that the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant proved by the preponderance of the evidence that he or she or it was unaware of what the New Jersey advertiser meant to do through the advertisement, the owner or publisher or operator cannot be held responsible or liable under the New Jersey consumer fraud act.

WHAT ARE PER SE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD VIOLATIONS?
The third basis for responsibility under the New Jersey consumer fraud act involves either a specific-situation New Jersey law or administrative regulations enacted to interpret the New Jersey consumer fraud act itself. Such New Jersey law and regulations define specific conduct prohibited by law. A per se New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act violation occurs when a New Jersey merchant violates a specific-situation New Jersey law or New Jersey Consumer Fraud administrative regulations. The following are examples of potential New Jersey consumer fraud act administrative regulations:
SUBCHAPTER 1 - DECEPTIVE MAIL ORDER PRACTICES
SUBCHAPTER 2 - MOTOR VEHICLE ADVERTISING PRACTICES
SUBCHAPTER 3 - SALE OF MEAT AT RETAIL
SUBCHAPTER 4 - BANNED HAZARDOUS PRODUCTS
SUBCHAPTER 5 - DELIVERY OF HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS
SUBCHAPTER 6 - DECEPTIVE PRACTICES CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE SALES PRACTICES
SUBCHAPTER 7 - DECEPTIVE PRACTICES CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS AND
ADVERTISING
SUBCHAPTER 8 - TIRE DISTRIBUTORS AND DEALERS
SUBCHAPTER 9 - MERCHANDISE ADVERTISING
SUBCHAPTER 10 - SERVICING & REPAIRING OF HOME APPLIANCES
SUBCHAPTER 11 - (RESERVED)
SUBCHAPTER 12 - SALE OF ANIMALS
SUBCHAPTER 13 - POWERS TO BE EXERCISED BY COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL OFFICERS OF
CONSUMER AFFAIRS
SUBCHAPTER 14 - UNIT PRICING OF CONSUMER COMMODITIES IN RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS
SUBCHAPTER 15 - DISCLOSURE OF REFUND POLICY IN RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT
SUBCHAPTER 16 - HOME IMPROVEMENT PRACTICES
SUBCHAPTER 17 - SALE OF ADVERTISING IN JOURNALS RELATING OR PURPORTING TO
RELATE TO POLICE, FIREFIGHTING OR CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS
SUBCHAPTER 18 - PLAIN LANGUAGE REVIEW
SUBCHAPTER 19 - (RESERVED)
SUBCHAPTER 20 - RESALE OF TICKETS OF ADMISSION TO PLACES OF ENTER¬TAINMENT
SUBCHAPTER 21 - REPRESENTATIONS CONCERNING AND REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SALE OF
KOSHER FOOD
SUBCHAPTER 22 - INSPECTIONS OF KOSHER MEAT DEALERS AND KOSHER POULTRY
DEALERS; RECORDS REQUIRED TO BE MAINTAINED BY KOSHER MEAT DEALERS AND
KOSHER POULTRY DEALERS
SUBCHAPTER 23 - DECEPTIVE PRACTICES CONCERNING WATERCRAFT REPAIR

The following are examples of New Jersey consumer fraud act law violations:
56:8-2.1 Operation simulating governmental agency
56:8-2.2 Scheme not to sell as advertised
56:8-2.3 Notification of prize winner
56:8-2.4 Picturing assembled merchandise
56:8-2.5 Selling item without price label
56:8-2.7 False solicitation of contribution
56:8-2.8 Going out of business sale
56:8-2.9 Misrepresentation of food
56:8-2.14 Refund Policy Disclosure Act
56:8-2.22 Providing copy of contract to consumer
56:8-2.23 Soliciting used goods
56:8-21 Unit Price Disclosure Act
56:8-26 Resale of tickets

WHAT TYPE OF DAMAGES CAN A SUCCESFUL NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD PLAINTIFF RECOVER AND HOW DOES A NEW JERSEY PLAINTIFF PROVE THEY SUFFERED DAMAGES UNDER THE NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD ACT?
New Jersey consumer fraud triple damages, also called New Jersey consumer fraud treble damages, are available to certain New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiffs. The tripling of the New Jersey consumer fraud award is meant to punish the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant. To win New Jersey consumer fraud triple damages under the New Jersey consumer fraud act, a New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff must prove that the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff lost money or property as a result of the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant’s New Jersey consumer fraud act violation. The New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff is allowed to receive an award of money for the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff’s consumer fraud loss proximately caused by the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant. If the New Jersey court finds that the New Jersey consumer fraud Act was violated and the New Jersey court awards New Jersey consumer fraud damages, the New Jersey consumer fraud act requires the New Jersey court to triple whatever amount of damages that the New Jersey court awards to the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff.

ARE NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY’S FEE AWARDS AVAILABLE TO A SUCCESFUL NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD PLAINTIFF?
If the New Jersey court award damages to a New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff, the New Jersey consumer fraud Act also requires the New Jersey court to compel the New Jersey consumer fraud defendant to pay whatever reasonable attorney’s fees that the New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff incurred in the New Jersey consumer fraud Act case. Only a New Jersey judge decides the proper amount of a New Jersey consumer fraud attorney’s fee award.

IS THERE A RIGHT TO A NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD JURY TRIAL IN A NEW JERSEY CONSUMER FRAUD CASE?
There appears to be no right to a New Jersey consumer fraud jury trial in an action brought by the Attorney General under the New Jersey consumer fraud act seeking both financial penalties and equitable relief. There appears to be a right to New Jersey consumer fraud jury trial for a New Jersey consumer fraud Act claim brought by a New Jersey consumer fraud plaintiff other than the Attorney General.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win the New Jersey court’s New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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