Law Office Of Paul DePetris
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New Jersey employment contract lawsuit facts

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The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT DISPUTE?
A New Jersey Employment Contract dispute is a dispute between a New Jersey employer and employee involving allegations that one party breached an oral or written contract about the terms of New Jersey employment.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ENFORCEABLE NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT?
In New Jersey, most employees are hired at will – that is, without a formal New Jersey Employment Contract. In theory, at will employees may leave their jobs without permission from their employer and the New Jersey employer generally has wide discretion as to whether to fire their New Jersey employees. There are exceptions to these rules and one of the exceptions is when the New Jersey employer and employee have entered into a New Jersey Employment Contract. A New Jersey Employment Contract is an exchange of promises and thus is the result of a “bargain,” an “exchange of equivalents.” An enforceable bilateral contract requires an offer, an acceptance, consideration and a meeting of the minds upon all the essential terms of the New Jersey Employment Contract. To have a valid New Jersey Employment Contract, there must be a meeting of the minds, as a New Jersey Employment Contract does not come into being unless the parties agree to the same terms. Thus, an enforceable contract only results from the parties’ agreeing upon essential terms and manifesting an intention to be bound by those terms and where the parties do not agree to one or more essential terms, the New Jersey Employment Contract may be unenforceable. The essential element to the valid consummation of a New Jersey Employment Contract is a meeting of the minds of the New Jersey Employment Contracting parties. Thus, doubt or difference between the parties to an alleged New Jersey Employment Contract is normally incompatible with the claim that the parties contract to terms. If the contemplated New Jersey Employment Contract is to be bilateral, the New Jersey employer and New Jersey employee alike must expressly contract as to every term of the New Jersey Employment Contract. The New Jersey employer does this in the New Jersey Employment Contract offer; the New Jersey employee must do it in his acceptance. New Jersey employment handbooks may also provide employees with certain rights and impact a New Jersey employer’s right to terminate their New Jersey employees.

HOW ARE NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS INTERPRETED?
When interpreting a New Jersey Employment Contract, it is not the real intent that controls but rather the intent expressed or apparent in the writing. Further, normally it is not the New Jersey Court’s role to make a new contract or to supply any material stipulations or conditions which contravene the New Jersey Employment Contracts of the parties. The mere fact that a New Jersey Employment Contract is somewhat harsh or unfair in its operation does not excuse the performance of same and a New Jersey court cannot create contractual obligations that are not based on the expressed intention of the parties. Indeed, a New Jersey court will not normally rewrite the New Jersey Employment Contract to provide the protection which a party failed to obtain for themselves. Instead, the judicial function of the New Jersey Court is normally to enforce the New Jersey Employment Contract as it is written. if a New Jersey Employment Contract contains ambiguous or doubtful terms, the New Jersey Employment Contract is generally construed against its drafter. In certain situations, the interpretation of a New Jersey Employment Contract may be a legal question for the New Jersey Court rather than for a New Jersey jury.

WHAT IS THE IMPLIED COVENANT OF GOOD FAITH AND FAIR DEALING?
New Jersey Employment Contract law implies a requirement that each party to a New Jersey Employment Contract must act in good faith and deal fairly with the other party in performing or enforcing the terms of the New Jersey Employment Contract. This implied New Jersey contract is part of the New Jersey Employment Contract, just as though the New Jersey Employment Contract expressly states this good faith and fair dealing require¬ment. To act in good faith and deal fairly, parties must act honestly toward one another when performing or enforcing the New Jersey Employment Contract. One party to the New Jersey Employment Contract cannot do anything that will have the effect of destroying or injuring another party’s right to receive the fruits of the New Jersey Employment Contract. However, if an enforceable contract never existed between the parties a claim for violation of the New Jersey covenant of good faith and fair dealing, such a claim would normally fail. For, in the absence of a New Jersey Employment Contract, there can be no breach of an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing.

DO NEW JERSEY EMPLOYEES OWE THEIR NEW JERSEY EMPLOYERS A DUTY TO BE LOYAL NEW JERSEY EMPLOYEES?
Regardless of whether an New Jersey employment agreement exists between a New Jersey employer and a New Jersey employee that contains a New Jersey restrictive covenant, a New Jersey employee is bound by a common law duty of loyalty precluding the New Jersey employee from acting contrary to the New Jersey employer’s legitimate interests. The obligation to protect the New Jersey employer's interests lasts until the last hour of the New Jersey employee’s service. New Jersey employees are not free to compete with their former employer until after termination of New Jersey employment. While employed, the New Jersey employee may not:

• Solicit the New Jersey employer’s customers or potential customers for a purpose that is in opposition to the New Jersey employer. This protection is not limited to precluding a New Jersey employee from soliciting its current customers; it includes prohibitions against “pursuing and transacting New Jersey business within the larger pool of potential customers who might have been solicited by the New Jersey employer”.

• Directly complete with the New Jersey employer.

• Aid the New Jersey employer’s competitor, even if such activity does not require the New Jersey employee to directly compete with the New Jersey employer.

• Take affirmative steps to injure the New Jersey employer’s New Jersey business.

• Secretly deprive the New Jersey employer of an economic opportunity.

• Disclose the New Jersey employer’s trade secrets or confidential information.

WHEN CAN A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYEE PREPARE TO START WORKING FOR A COMPETITOR?
The New Jersey employment duty of loyalty does not itself prevent a New Jersey employee from making arrangements to start new New Jersey employment with a competitor. The key distinction is that a New Jersey employee cannot directly compete with the current employer until after New Jersey employment with that employee terminates. Thus, a New Jersey employee may not breach the undivided loyalty owed to the New Jersey employer while still employed, either by soliciting the New Jersey employer's customers or by other acts of secret competition. The New Jersey employment duty of loyalty prohibits the New Jersey employee from taking affirmative steps, while still employed, to injure the New Jersey employer's New Jersey business. Thus, while still employed, the New Jersey employee should not engage in any conduct causing the New Jersey employer to lose customers, sales or potential sales. This obligation to protect the New Jersey employer's interests lasts until the last hour of the New Jersey employee’s service. While still employed, the New Jersey employee may not ask customers to transfer their New Jersey business, even if the actual transfer does not occur until the after New Jersey employment concludes. Whether a New Jersey employee's conduct constitutes unfair competition or was merely preparatory to new New Jersey employment is a matter of degree and depends upon the facts and circumstances of the New Jersey Employment Contract case.


WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY RESTRICTIVE COVENANT OR NEW JERSEY NONCOMPETE CLAUSE?
A New Jersey restrictive covenant, also known as a New Jersey noncompete clause, is a section in a New Jersey Employment Contract which prohibits or restricts a New Jersey employee from performing certain actions. A New Jersey employee may enter into a New Jersey restrictive covenant either before or after the period of New Jersey employment ends. Post New Jersey employment New Jersey restrictive covenants are not necessarily invalid in New Jersey.

ARE NEW JERSEY RESTRICTIVE COVENANTS ENFORECEABLE IN NEW JERSEY COURT?
The enforceability of New Jersey restrictive covenants depends in large part upon their reasonableness under the particular circumstances. Noncompetition contracts are looked upon unfavorably by the New Jersey Courts, as potential restraints on trade. To be enforceable, a New Jersey restrictive covenant must be reasonable under the circumstances in the New Jersey Employment Contract case before the New Jersey Court. New Jersey noncompete contracts will be totally or partially enforced to the extent reasonably necessary to protect the New Jersey employer's legitimate interests, will cause no undue hardship on the New Jersey employee and will not impair the public interest. The Supreme Court set forth the following four pronged test for determining the reasonableness of New Jersey restrictive covenants (often referred to by commentators as a three pronged test insofar as they omit the first prong):
• The New Jersey employer has a protectable interest.
• The New Jersey restrictive covenant must be no more restrictive than is necessary to protect the “legitimate interests of the New Jersey employer.
• The New Jersey restrictive covenant must impose “no undue hardship on the New Jersey employee.
• The New Jersey restrictive covenant must not be “injurious to the public interest.”

To be enforceable, the New Jersey restrictive covenant must generally meet all 4 of the aforesaid requirements. Moreover, the New Jersey Court may seek evidence that the New Jersey restrictive covenant is based on adequate consideration.
Usually, the issue of whether the New Jersey restrictive covenant is enforceable amounts to a fact sensitive test, since the validity and enforceability of a covenant against competition is fact-sensitive and must be determined in light of the facts of the New Jersey Employment Contract case. In one case, a New Jersey court enforced a post-New Jersey employment New Jersey restrictive covenant where the prohibition was reasonably necessary for the protection of the New Jersey employment of the New Jersey employer, was not unreasonably restrictive in point of time or territory upon the rights of the New Jersey employee and was not prejudicial to the public interests. Since, a breach of contract is never presumed; rather, the burden of establishing a breach of contract rests with the party asserting the breach. In appropriate cases, a Chancery court shall intervene, providing injunctive relief to prevent the breach of New Jersey noncompete contracts and solicitation of a New Jersey employer’s personnel and customers and shall enjoin a New Jersey employee for the use or disclosure of trade secrets or confidential information acquired from a former employer. However, where there is no express covenant between a New Jersey employer and employee, absent a showing of fraud or breach of trust, the New Jersey Court shall generally not enjoin a New Jersey employee, after termination of his New Jersey employment, from honest competition with the former employer, even to the extent of soliciting the former employer’s customers. Indeed, unless a New Jersey employee is restrained by an enforceable covenant not to compete, he or she usually may freely compete with a former employer by accepting New Jersey employment with a rival or by undertaking his or her own competing New Jersey employment. In this regard, a New Jersey employee who is not otherwise bound by a New Jersey restrictive covenant may, after termination of New Jersey employment, and in the absence of any breach of trust, compete honestly with his or her former employer. Accordingly, in such circumstances, neither the decision to compete nor the entering into competition is actionable.

In addition, it is not a New Jersey court’s function to make a New Jersey Employment Contract for the parties or to supply terms not previously agreed upon. A New Jersey court shall not normally relieve a party from the hardship they might have guarded against and thus, the New Jersey Court shall enforce the New Jersey Employment Contract which the parties themselves made. A New Jersey court will not generally rewrite the New Jersey Employment Contract to provide the protection which a party failed to obtain for themselves. For, it is not the function of a New Jersey court to make a better contract for the parties or to supply terms not previously agreed upon. If a New Jersey Employment Contract’s terms are clear, a New Jersey court must merely enforce them as written. Accordingly, where a written contract is complete and unambiguous on its face, the parties are bound by the intentions they express in same. Moreover, where a written contract contains ambiguous or doubtful terms, the New Jersey Employment Contract is construed against its drafter.

Moreover, the common law duty of loyalty does not itself necessarily preclude a New Jersey employee from making arrangements to commence new New Jersey employment with a competitor. The key distinction between such arrangements and competition is usually that a New Jersey employee cannot directly compete with the current employer until after New Jersey employment with that employee terminates. Whether a New Jersey employee's conduct constitutes unfair competition or was merely preparatory to new New Jersey employment is a matter of degree and depends upon the facts and circumstances of the New Jersey Employment Contract case.

However, New Jersey Courts have held that the enforcement of New Jersey restrictive covenants does not depend on the existence of a written contract of New Jersey employment for such contracts need not be in writing but may be evidenced by conduct rather than words. A New Jersey Employment Contract of New Jersey employment may be express or implied. A hiring contract does not require formality. While assent to the New Jersey Employment Contract offer of New Jersey employment "must be manifested in order to be legally effective, it need not be expressed in words." The necessary assent may be expressed in words, or it may be "implied from conduct without words." One could however argue that, while the parties’ New Jersey Employment Contract itself need not be in writing, to satisfy the requirements of a valid New Jersey restrictive covenant, the New Jersey restrictive covenant itself must be in writing.

WHAT DAMAGES ARE AVAILABLE FOR A NEW JERSEY BREACH OF EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT?
Where two parties have made a New Jersey Employment Contract, which one of them has broken, the damages which the other party ought to receive, in respect of such breach, should be such as may fairly be considered either arising naturally, i.e., according to the usual course of things, from such breach of contract itself, or such as may reasonably be supposed to have been in the contemplation of both parties at the time they made the New Jersey Employment Contract, as the probable result of the breach of it. Contract damages are generally designed to put the injured party in as good a position as if the New Jersey Employment Contract had been performed. For example, in a lease transaction, the lessee is generally entitled to recover the value of the lease term, which, in the absence of special circumstances, is the difference between the actual rental value and the rent reserved. A party is not generally chargeable for a New Jersey Employment Contract loss that the party had no reason to foresee as a probable result of the alleged breach when the New Jersey Employment Contract was made. Further, the loss must be a reasonably certain consequence of the breach. However, on occasion, courts impose damages in excess of what parties to a contract may have contemplated.

CAN ONE EMPLOYER FORCE ANOTHER EMPLOYER TO PERFORM OBLIGATIONS UNDER A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT (NEW JERSEY SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE)?
New Jersey specific performance is an equitable remedy available to a party to a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit if they can establish that mere legal relief such as an award of damages would be insufficient to make the claimant whole. Under the doctrine of New Jersey specific performance, a New Jersey court orders a party guilty of a breach of contract to, under the danger of court penalties, perform under the New Jersey Employment Contract or if they already began to perform and stopped, to complete performance under the New Jersey Employment Contract. To establish a right to the remedy of New Jersey specific performance, a New Jersey employee or employer must demonstrate that the New Jersey Employment Contract in question is valid and enforceable at law, that the terms of the New Jersey Employment Contract are expressed in such fashion that the New Jersey Court can determine, with reasonable certainty, the duties of each party and the conditions under which performance is due and that an order compelling performance of the New Jersey Employment Contract will not be harsh or oppressive. The right to New Jersey specific performance turns not only on whether the claimant has demonstrated a right to legal relief but also whether the performance of the New Jersey Employment Contract represents an equitable result. The remedy of New Jersey specific performance is in the New Jersey Court’s discretion to grant or deny. When New Jersey specific performance is sought, the New Jersey Court is required to do more than merely determine whether the New Jersey Employment Contract is valid and enforceable; the New Jersey Court of equity must also appraise the respective conduct and situation of the parties, the clarity of the New Jersey Employment Contract itself notwithstanding that it may be legally enforceable and the impact that an order of New Jersey specific performance could have (i.e., whether such an order is harsh or oppressive to the wrongdoer or whether a denial of New Jersey specific performance leaves the claimant with an adequate remedy). In addition, the party seeking New Jersey specific performance must stand in conscientious relation to his adversary – that party’s conduct in the matter must have been fair, just and equitable rather than sharp or aiming at unfair advantage. Such weighing of equitable considerations must represent, in each New Jersey Employment Contract case, a conscious attempt on the New Jersey Court’s part to render complete justice to both parties regarding their contractual relationship. A New Jersey court will often direct performance of such a New Jersey Employment Contract because, when there is no excuse for the failure to perform, New Jersey Employment Contract law of equity regards and treats as done what in good conscience ought to be done. However, New Jersey specific performance of a New Jersey Employment Contract will not be awarded where the New Jersey Employment Contract is incomplete, uncertain or too indefinite in its material terms to be specifically enforced in equity.

HOW DOES A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYEE OR NEW JERSEY EMPLOYER FILE A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT FOR RELIEF IN AN NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT DISPUTE?
A New Jersey employee or employer may file a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit – called a “New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit” -- in Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part if the amount in dispute (excluding attorney’s fees) exceeds $15,000.00 and in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part if the amount in dispute (excluding attorney’s fees) does not exceed $15,000.00 by preparing a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit and case information statement and filing it by either visiting the New Jersey Superior Courthouse or appropriate Court Finance Office in the county where you intend to file the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit – all of which are located in the county seat of the appropriate county -- or by sending the necessary New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork to the appropriate county office of the Superior Court of New Jersey. You must pay a fee to file your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit that is sometimes determined based on the number of parties you are suing, the dollar amount of the dispute and the type of New Jersey trial you want. The New Jersey Court fees often change, so it is important that you check with the New Jersey Court as to the appropriate fee when you are actually ready to file your papers. Only persons age 18 or older are able to file a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit for themselves (minors must file a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit through their parent or guardian). There are specific rules about the proper county in which to file New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits, which depend on various considerations. New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit forms are often available at the appropriate offices each county court and via the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. It is extremely important that you prepare your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit very carefully and make sure that you include in the document a detailed list of all factual and legal reasons why you may have a right to win your New Jersey Employment Contract case, since failure to do so could cause you to lose your New Jersey Employment Contract case. It is very common for people to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits that result in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answers to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after New Jersey trial because of procedural deficiencies. Normally, in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part, the New Jersey Court serves the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit on the defendants whereas in Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, you must have a process server serve the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit. Most New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits filed in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part that go to New Jersey trial are New Jersey nonjury trials, meaning that only a New Jersey judge hears the New Jersey Employment Contract case. For an extra fee paid only when you first file your first New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit (or paid when you file your first New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, if you are responding to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit), you may demand a New Jersey trial by 6 New Jersey jurors. If you are filing a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit in Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, there is no additional fee for a New Jersey jury trial but you must demand it within a specific time frame or waive the right to a New Jersey jury. New Jersey jury trials are much more complex than New Jersey nonjury trials and usually require much more preparation, including extensive paperwork. However, a New Jersey jury trial demand may result in the facts of your New Jersey Employment Contract case being decided by a New Jersey jury of ordinary people rather than by a single New Jersey judge. Even where a party requests a New Jersey jury trial, the legal issues in the New Jersey trial are normally decided by the New Jersey judge hearing the New Jersey Employment Contract case. Note that this article does not attempt to discuss relief available to employees in Chancery Division, General Equity Part.

WHAT IF I OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS IS SUED?
If you or your New Jersey business is sued in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, you or your New Jersey business shall be named to a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim and must file a written response to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim, called an “New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer” and a New Jersey Employment Contract case information statement. Failure to do so will normally result in your being defaulted and exposes you to the risk of having a money New Jersey judgment entered against you or your New Jersey employment and thereafter, possibly losing money or property. You may file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer by preparing a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer disputing charges made against you or your New Jersey employment in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim and requesting that the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part dismiss the wrong charges. If plaintiff or someone that isn’t named in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit owes you money or property based on the same set of facts as those in dispute in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or facts related to the dispute, in addition to filing an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, you may also be able to file a New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim or third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit to recover the money or property (discussed below). Forms are often available at the appropriate county court offices and via the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. It is very common for people to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits that result in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answers to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits being rejected by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part or being dismissed after filing and before or after New Jersey trial because of procedural deficiencies. It is important to be truthful and not to make misstatements of facts when New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answering New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits and New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims. It is extremely important that you prepare your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer very carefully and make sure that you include in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer a detailed list of all defenses against the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim that you are responding to, since failure to do so could cause you to lose your New Jersey Employment Contract case. Accordingly, when your New Jersey employment is sued, you should seriously consider hiring a New Jersey attorney to prepare your response to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim, to prepare written requests for information to the party that sued you (discussed further below) and if you can afford it, to have a New Jersey attorney represent you in New Jersey Court. After your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer is prepared, you must file it by either visiting the New Jersey Superior Courthouse or appropriate Court Finance Office in the county where the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit was filed – all of which are located in the county seat of the appropriate county -- or by sending the necessary New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork to the appropriate county office of the Superior Court of New Jersey. You must pay a fee to file your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer that is sometimes determined based on the amount of the original dispute and the type of New Jersey trial you want and whether you intend to add parties to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit (discussed below). Only persons age 18 or older are able to file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer for themselves (minors must file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer through their parent or guardian). Most cases filed in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part that go to New Jersey trial are New Jersey nonjury trials, meaning that only a New Jersey judge hears the New Jersey Employment Contract case. For an extra fee paid only when you first file your first New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, you may demand a New Jersey trial by 6 New Jersey jurors. If you are filing a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit in Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, there is no additional fee for a New Jersey jury trial but you must demand it within a specific time frame or waive the right to a New Jersey jury. New Jersey jury trials are much more complex than New Jersey nonjury trials and usually require much more preparation, including extensive paperwork. However, a New Jersey jury trial demand may result in the facts of your New Jersey Employment Contract case being decided by a New Jersey jury of ordinary people rather than by a single New Jersey judge. Even where a party requests a New Jersey jury trial, the legal issues in the New Jersey trial are normally decided by the New Jersey judge hearing the New Jersey Employment Contract case.

WHAT IF I OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS IS SUED BUT SOMEONE OWES ME OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS MONEY BECAUSE OF THE SITUATION THAT IS THE SUBJECT OF THE NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT?
If you or your New Jersey business is a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant and plaintiff or someone that isn’t named in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit owes you money or property based on the same set of facts as those in dispute in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or facts related to the dispute, in addition to filing an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, you may also be able to file a New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim or third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit to recover the money or property (discussed below). If there are valid facts and legal reasons to support it, a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant can file their own lawsuit against a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit plaintiff, called a “New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim If your New Jersey employment is sued and someone who is not named in New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit is partially or totally responsible for the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff’s damages or for damages you suffered and there are valid facts and legal reasons to support it, a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant can file their own New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit, called a “third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit”. By doing so, the defendant names parties not originally named to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit as additional parties to the New Jersey Employment Contract case. New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims and third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits must be prepared in writing and filed with the appropriate court where the original New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit is being heard normally require extra fees above the cost of filing an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer to the original New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit. In the New Jersey Employment Contract case of a third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit, once properly filed, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part normally serves it on the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff. In Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, you must have a process server serve the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit. Forms may be available at the appropriate office of the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part and via the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. It is very common for people to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims that result in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answers to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims being rejected by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or being dismissed by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part after filing and before or after New Jersey trial because of procedural deficiencies. It is important to be truthful and not to make misstatements of facts when New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answering New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits and filing New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims and third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits. It is extremely important that you prepare your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim or third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit carefully and make sure that you include in the New Jersey Employment Contract case documents a detailed list of all reasons why you may have a right to win your New Jersey Employment Contract case, since failure to do so could cause you to lose your New Jersey Employment Contract case. Accordingly, when your New Jersey employment is sued and when you want to file a New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim or third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit, you should seriously consider hiring a New Jersey attorney to prepare your response to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim, to prepare written requests for information to the party that sued you (discussed further below) and if you can afford it, to have a New Jersey attorney represent you in New Jersey Court. After your New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim or third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit is prepared, you must file it by either visiting the New Jersey Superior Courthouse or appropriate Court Finance Office in the county where the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit was filed – all of which are located in the county seat of the appropriate county -- or by sending the necessary New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork to the appropriate county office of the Superior Court of New Jersey. You must pay a fee to file the document that is determined based on the amount of the original dispute and the type of New Jersey trial you want and it may also be based on whether you intend to add parties to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit. You must also decide whether to demand a New Jersey jury trial within a specific timeframe or waive the right.

WHAT IF I OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS FILED A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT AND DEFENDANT FILED A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT COUNTERCLAIM AGAINST ME OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS?
If there are valid facts and legal reasons to support it, a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant can file their own lawsuit against a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit plaintiff, called a “New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim”. If you are named to a New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim, you must file a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer to the New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim. Failure to do so will normally result in your being defaulted and exposes you to the risk of having a money New Jersey judgment entered against you or your New Jersey employment and thereafter, possibly losing money or property. It is possible for plaintiffs to win on their New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit only to lose on a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant’s New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim. You may file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer by preparing a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer disputing charges made against you or your New Jersey employment in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim and requesting that the New Jersey Court dismiss the wrong charges. If plaintiff or someone that isn’t named in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit owes you money or property based on the same set of facts as those in dispute in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or facts related to the dispute, in addition to filing an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, you may also be able to file third party New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit to recover the money or property (discussed above). Forms may be available at the appropriate office of the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part and via the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. It is very common for people to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits that result in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits or New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answers to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits being rejected by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after New Jersey trial because of procedural deficiencies. It is important to be truthful and not to make misstatements of facts when New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answering New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits and New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaims. It is extremely important that you prepare your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer very carefully and make sure that you include in the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer a detailed list of all defenses against the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim that you are responding to, since failure to do so could cause you to lose your New Jersey Employment Contract case. Accordingly, when your New Jersey employment is sued, you should seriously consider hiring a New Jersey attorney to prepare your response to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit or New Jersey Employment Contract counterclaim, to prepare written requests for information to the party that sued you (discussed further below) and if you can afford it, to have a New Jersey attorney represent you in New Jersey Court. After your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer is prepared, you must file it by either visiting the New Jersey Superior Courthouse or appropriate Court Finance Office in the county where the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit was filed – all of which are located in the county seat of the appropriate county -- or by sending the necessary New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork to the appropriate county office of the Superior Court of New Jersey. You must pay a fee to file your New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer that is determined based on the amount of the original dispute and the type of New Jersey trial you want and whether you intend to add parties to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit (discussed below). Only persons age 18 or older are able to file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer for themselves (minors must file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer through their parent or guardian). Most cases filed in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part that go to New Jersey trial are New Jersey nonjury trials, meaning that only a New Jersey judge hears the New Jersey Employment Contract case. For an extra fee paid only when you first file your first New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer, you may demand a New Jersey trial by 6 New Jersey jurors. In Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, there is n no additional fee for a New Jersey jury trial but you must demand it within a certain time period or waive your right to a New Jersey jury. New Jersey jury trials are much more complex than New Jersey nonjury trials and usually require much more preparation, including extensive paperwork. However, a New Jersey jury trial demand may result in the facts of your New Jersey Employment Contract case being decided by a New Jersey jury of ordinary people rather than by a single New Jersey judge. Even where a party requests a New Jersey jury trial, the legal issues in the New Jersey trial are normally decided by the New Jersey judge hearing the New Jersey Employment Contract case.

WHAT HAPPENS IF THE CLAIM INVOLVES A CORPORATION OR LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY?
The officers, managing members and directors of companies, limited liability companies and the like cannot generally appear in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division Special Civil Part in cases involving disputes exceeding $3,000 or in any Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part cases whatsoever, since the corporation, partnership or limited liability company must usually be represented by a New Jersey attorney. There may be some exceptions to this rule, such as where the New Jersey Employment Contract case involves a summary action for possession of premises. Also, if you sue a New Jersey company and the company represents itself at New Jersey trial and you thereafter win the New Jersey Employment Contract case and recover a New Jersey judgment, it is possible that the company shall get the New Jersey judgment overturned because they were not permitted to appear in New Jersey Court for themselves in the first place! There are no such limitations imposed upon sole proprietors.

IF I OR MY NEW JERSEY BUSINESS IS A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT LAWSUIT PLAINTIFF OR NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT LAWSUIT DEFENDANT, WILL THE OTHER SIDE HAVE A NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY?
If you are not represented by a New Jersey attorney in a special civil part case, you are called a “pro se litigant”. While people can and often do represent themselves in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part court and occasionally represent themselves in Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, their opponent may be represented by a New Jersey attorney, which often places the unrepresented party at a major disadvantage. If possible, hire a New Jersey attorney to at least prepare any necessary court paperwork and if you can afford it, to also appear and represent you in New Jersey Court at any motions or New Jersey trials. The proper preparation of legal papers and preparation of a New Jersey Employment Contract case for New Jersey trial often requires knowledge of legal issues that only attorneys have. New Jersey court rules and evidence rules are often complex and accordingly, are often difficult to follow. New Jersey trials can be very complex and time consuming – sometimes they take all day or more than one day to complete. People who are not attorneys licensed to practice law in New Jersey are not able to give you legal advice about special civil disputes that are heard by New Jersey courts, regardless of whether the people work for a New Jersey court or work for a New Jersey attorney.

IF THE OTHER SIDE IN A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT HIRES A NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY, SHOULD I DEAL WITH THE NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE ATTORNEY OR THEIR CLIENTS?
If a party is represented by a New Jersey attorney in a civil part dispute, you must generally avoid having oral or written contact regarding the New Jersey Employment Contract case with the represented party and instead, must make all communications involving the New Jersey Employment Contract case through the represented party’s attorney.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT IS FILED?
After the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit is filed, in small claims proceedings, court staff shall serve the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit on the defendants, usually by mailing it by certified and regular mail. In Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part cases, a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit plaintiff or third party plaintiff normally uses a process server to serve the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuits upon their adversaries. A New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant has 35 days following service of a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit to file an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer. The New Jersey summons should state the date on which the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit was served. If a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant fails to file a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer to the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit, in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part the New Jersey Court clerk should automatically enter a default on the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part’s docket. The Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part normally mails the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff a notice stating the date on which cases are automatically defaulted (35 days after service of the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer). If a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant files a written New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer and pays the necessary fee, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part normally sends a notice of that an New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer was filed. In Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part, once the time for a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer expires, if no New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer is filed, the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff must file a request for entry of default. Once a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit and New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer are filed in the New Jersey Employment Contract case, whenever one party sends any kind of paperwork to the New Jersey Court, they must generally send complete copies of the New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork to all other parties involved in their New Jersey Employment Contract case (or if they are represented, to the parties’ attorneys). If a party fails to follow this procedure, they may be punished by the New Jersey Court for the failure and any relief they ask for and receive from the New Jersey Court can often be reversed for the failure. The parties may engage in New Jersey Employment Contract case discovery – a factfinding process during which each party tries to find out more about the other party’s position. New Jersey Employment Contract case discovery often involves parties serving each other with written requests for information called interrogatories, notices to produce (sometimes also called requests for production of New Jersey Employment Contract case documents) and requests for admissions. These requests are served by you and not the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part by mailing the New Jersey Employment Contract case documents via regular and certified mail, return receipt requested (if the other party is unrepresented) on the other parties or by regular mail only on the other parties’ attorney, if they are represented by a New Jersey attorney. However, it is often best to send all New Jersey Employment Contract case documents to any opponent by regular main and also by certified mail, return receipt requested to make sure you have proof that the New Jersey Employment Contract case documents were received by your opponent. If either party fails to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer these requests in writing or fails to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer the requests with sufficient thoroughness, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part may punish the delinquent party, such as by throwing their New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit out of court or suppressing their New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer. At some point after the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit is filed and New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answered, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part sends the parties a notice stating the New Jersey trial date. Failure to carefully prepare and serve thorough written requests for information could result in your losing your New Jersey Employment Contract case, since you may be in the dark about what the other party intends to do at New Jersey trial. If a New Jersey Employment Contract case is coming up for New Jersey trial and you never received responses to your written requests for information, you may have a right to get more time from the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part to get the requests New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answered. New Jersey Employment Contract case discovery can be a very tricky and important part of the New Jersey Employment Contract case and to make sure that it is conducted right, you should seriously consider hiring a New Jersey attorney to prepare your written requests for information to your opponents or to other parties involved in the New Jersey Employment Contract case or even to witnesses and if you can afford it, to have a New Jersey attorney represent you in New Jersey Court.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT LAWSUIT DEFENDANT IS DEFAULTED?
If a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant is automatically defaulted by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or in a Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part case, if a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit plaintiff files the necessary New Jersey Employment Contract case paperwork for a default and it is entered, then no New Jersey trial will occur (unless the New Jersey Court vacates the New Jersey default) and the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff has a certain number of months from the date of the entry of default to file additional paperwork with the New Jersey Court to seek a New Jersey default judgment against a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant. In some New Jersey Employment Contract cases, securing a New Jersey default judgment only requires the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff to submit paperwork, while in other New Jersey Employment Contract cases, the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff has to prepare and file a New Jersey motion and the New Jersey Court may require the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff and defendant to appear at a New Jersey court hearing – a “proof hearing”.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A NEW JERSEY DEFAULT JUDGMENT IS ENTERED AGAINST YOU OR YOUR NEW JERSEY BUSINESS AND YOU IGNORE IT?
If you ignore a New Jersey judgment, your bank account may be frozen and money in it turned over to the New Jersey judgment holder, some of your wages may be taken from you, your personal property may be seized by the sheriff and sold to satisfy the New Jersey judgment and/or a lien may be put against a house you own. Often people wait until their bank account is frozen or until their wages are attached to take action – at that point it is difficult and sometimes too late to do anything to successfully stop those collection efforts. It is not uncommon to refuse to help such latecomers from taking issue with the collection efforts unless they file papers with the New Jersey Court for relief. However, once a New Jersey judgment is entered against you or your New Jersey employment, you may ask the New Jersey Court to remove or “vacate” the New Jersey judgment (discussed below).

DO I NEED A NEW JERSEY EXPERT WITNESS TO PROVE MY NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE?
Often to prove one’s New Jersey Employment Contract case or to successfully defend against a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit, it is necessary to hire a New Jersey expert witness to prepare a proper New Jersey expert report and to testify regarding another party’s misconduct and the damages sustained as a result of the misconduct. If scientific, technical, or other specialized knowledge will assist the factfinder at New Jersey trial to understand the evidence or to determine a fact in issue, a witness qualified as a New Jersey expert by knowledge, skill, experience, training, or education may testify thereto in the form of an opinion or otherwise. To be considered by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part, a New Jersey expert’s opinion must meet three basic requirements: (1) the intended testimony must concern a subject matter that is beyond the knowledge of the average New Jersey juror; (2) the subject testified to must be at a state of the art such that a New Jersey expert’s testimony could be sufficiently reliable; and (3) New Jersey witness must have sufficient expertise to offer the intended testimony. To meet the element of whether New Jersey expert testimony is sufficiently reliable, the party offering the New Jersey expert testimony must demonstrate that the New Jersey expert’s opinion or theory is generally accepted within the scientific community. A New Jersey expert's opinion must be supported by facts or data either in the record or of a type usually relied upon by experts in the field. Bare conclusions of a New Jersey expert that are not supported by factual evidence are inadmissible. Likewise, expert conclusions based on discredited or improperly performed diagnostic tools are suspect. A New Jersey expert's New Jersey trial testimony is confined to the opinion reflected in his or her report. Many expert opinions are never admitted into evidence and New Jersey experts are thereby prevented from testifying at New Jersey trial because the New Jersey Court finds the reports unreliable and/or inadequate. Therefore, simply hiring a New Jersey expert does not assure that you shall get their testimony into evidence. Professional experts usually charge a fee to inspect your property and write a report – sometimes they bill by the hour and sometimes via a flat fee arrangement linked to each service they are to perform. The New Jersey expert normally sends a copy of their report to the party who hired the New Jersey expert. If your New Jersey Employment Contract case requires expert testimony and the matter goes all the way to New Jersey trial, it shall be necessary to have the New Jersey expert appear at and testify at same. The New Jersey expert usually charges additional fees for the time during which they must appear at New Jersey trial but you may get the New Jersey expert to include such services as part of the fee to perform inspections and to write reports. While there are some exceptions, normally, courts do not allow people to show up at New Jersey trial to introduce into evidence estimates, New Jersey aexpert reports and other New Jersey Employment Contract case documents that they never prepared and witnesses are often necessary to prove one’s New Jersey Employment Contract case, especially when it comes to the party’s damages.

WHAT IS NEW JERSEY MEDIATION?
In some New Jersey Employment Contract cases, before the New Jersey trial occurs the New Jersey Court requires the parties to mediate their dispute. Mediation is an informal hearing normally held in a conference room. You and the other party and any attorneys involved in the New Jersey Employment Contract case appear at the mediation. The mediation is conducted by a neutral court appointed mediator. The mediator is trained in resolving disputes through the process of mediation. Accordingly, the mediator attempts to resolve the New Jersey Employment Contract case by suggesting a possible settlement to both parties. During the mediation, none of the parties is required to settle the New Jersey Employment Contract case. Indeed, one or all of the parties may not even make any offer to settle. Note that cases do not always undergo mediation. If the New Jersey Employment Contract case cannot be settled before New Jersey trial and your New Jersey Employment Contract case is called to be tried, you must be prepared to present your New Jersey Employment Contract case or defenses.

WHAT HAPPENS AT NEW JERSEY ARBITRATION?
Many cases are scheduled to be arbitrated. The New Jersey arbitration is an informal hearing conducted in a conference room during which you shall be present along with your attorney if you are represented. Depending on whether you decide to schedule and hire your expert or schedule other witnesses to be present, they may also be present, as well as any New Jersey experts or witnesses for the defense. New Jersey arbitrators are neutral attorneys appointed by the New Jersey Court to conduct a hearing regarding the facts and law of the New Jersey Employment Contract case and to make a decision based on same. At the New Jersey arbitration, you will be called upon to give testimony regarding the facts of your New Jersey Employment Contract case. If you schedule and pay your expert to be present or if you have other witnesses present, the New Jersey employment contract case arbitrator may permit them to also provide testimony regarding your New Jersey Employment Contract case and be subject to cross examination. Your opponent will have an opportunity to cross examine you and your witnesses in an effort to challenge your allegations. If they do this, they shall seek to destroy your New Jersey Employment Contract case or your defenses. Based on the testimony provided by New Jersey witnesses and the legal arguments made by the parties or if represented, by their New Jersey attorneys, the New Jersey employment contract case arbitrator shall render a decision for one or more of the parties – someone shall win and someone shall lose. The New Jersey employment contract case arbitrator prepares a written decision and provides a copy to each party. If any party is unhappy with the New Jersey employment contract case arbitrator’s decision, they have 30 days from the date of the decision to reject New Jersey arbitration award by requesting a New Jersey trial and by paying a fee. If the decision is rejected, the New Jersey Court then sets a date for the New Jersey Employment Contract case to go to New Jersey trial. If no one rejects it, the New Jersey arbitration decision, the winner files New Jersey employment contract case papers with the New Jersey Court to confirm the New Jersey arbitration results, which generally then becomes a final New Jersey judgment, resolving the New Jersey Employment Contract case forever.

WHAT HAPPENS AT YOUR NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE TRIAL?
On the day that your New Jersey Employment Contract case goes to New Jersey trial you must appear at court. Usually, many cases are heard on the day that your New Jersey Employment Contract case is called for New Jersey trial and it is not uncommon for many people to wait in a single courtroom for their New Jersey Employment Contract case to be called. You must be on time to avoid losing your New Jersey Employment Contract case! If a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit plaintiff fails to appear when their New Jersey Employment Contract case is called, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part is likely to dismiss the New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit. If a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant fails to appear when the New Jersey Employment Contract case is called, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part shall likely enter a default. If a default is entered, you shall have to prepare and file paperwork with the New Jersey Court asking the New Jersey Court to enter a New Jersey default judgment in your favor. If no default is entered, you must be prepared to present your New Jersey Employment Contract case or defense. It is not uncommon for New Jersey judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey Employment Contract case. A New Jersey court has the power to punish unprepared parties, such as by throwing their New Jersey Employment Contract case out of court or limiting what they can present at New Jersey trial. You must bring all New Jersey Employment Contract case documents, photographs, videos and other items with you to the New Jersey trial that are necessary to prove your New Jersey Employment Contract case (preferably originals). Even if you bring such New Jersey Employment Contract case documents and items to court, a New Jersey judge may refuse to allow you to use them at your New Jersey trial. New Jersey has published cases, laws, regulations, New Jersey court rules and rules of evidence that are very tricky and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at New Jersey trial. Accordingly, before New Jersey trial, you must consult all of these rules to determine how you intend to get your New Jersey Employment Contract case documents and items into evidence or how to properly use them at New Jersey trial. Hearsay rules of evidence are particularly troublesome and you should study them carefully before New Jersey trial. For example, it is very common for New Jersey courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to New Jersey Employment Contract case documents or items that the person themselves never prepared. Often parties stumble into special civil part with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey judge tell the parties that it is not going to even consider such items or New Jersey Employment Contract case documents. Without the proper preparation, items and New Jersey Employment Contract case documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at New Jersey trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to New Jersey court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases. If you have any witnesses that you need to testify for you at New Jersey trial, then in advance of the New Jersey trial and as required by New Jersey court rules, laws and published cases, you must prepare a written subpoena (or subpoenas if the New Jersey Employment Contract case is adjourned). Such a subpoena must normally be personally served by a process server rather than by mail. If you want to force one of the parties to the New Jersey Employment Contract case to testify as part of your New Jersey Employment Contract case, since they might not show up at the New Jersey trial (it is possible that only their attorney will show up), you should serve them with a notice in lieu of subpoena. If you think that you could have problems getting someone to show up to provide testimony at New Jersey trial, you should have a process server serve them with a subpoena or if they are a party to the dispute, a notice in lieu of subpoena. Without witnesses to testify at New Jersey trial (especially experts, discussed above), you may lose your New Jersey Employment Contract case. New Jersey trials can be very complex and time consuming – sometimes they take all day or more than one day to complete. Also, it is very common for New Jersey trials to get adjourned because someone is not ready to present their New Jersey Employment Contract case for a valid reason (but you can never expect that you shall automatically get an adjournment and you must always be fully ready to try your New Jersey Employment Contract case on the date that the New Jersey trial is scheduled since courts often refuse adjournment requests and dismiss cases if parties are not prepared to proceed with their New Jersey Employment Contract case or defense on the New Jersey trial date). It is best to have your questions for any witnesses prepared in advance. At the end of New Jersey trial, the New Jersey Court normally enters a New Jersey judgment for or against you or your New Jersey employment. The New Jersey Court may also withhold or “reserve” New Jersey judgment for a later date, which normally results in the New Jersey judge hearing the New Jersey Employment Contract case taking time to write up its reasons for its decision and mailing it to the parties’ last known addresses (or to their New Jersey attorneys, if they are represented).

IS IT POSSIBLE TO SETTLE MY NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE?
Parties may voluntarily agree to settle their New Jersey Employment Contract case but preparing the proper settlement contract requires great care. Normally, at any New Jersey trial proceeding, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part has settlement forms for the parties to complete. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. For example, what if you don’t include protections to yourself in the New Jersey Employment Contract? A New Jersey court may refuse to enforce a New Jersey Employment Contract case settlement contract if it is unclear what the parties agreed to. Also, if a party fails to honor a New Jersey Employment Contract case settlement, you may have to return to court if you want to enforce the settlement, which normally requires you to file a New Jersey motion. If you can afford a New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey Employment Contract case attorney prepare the settlement contract so that they can try to make the other parties agree to the best settlement terms for you. If you do settle your New Jersey Employment Contract case yourself, you should notify the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part as soon as possible – with a phone call and then followed up in writing. If the New Jersey Employment Contract case is settled before New Jersey trial, you should make every effort to advise the New Jersey Court before the New Jersey trial occurs.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I GET A NEW JERSEY JUDGMENT?
Once you get a New Jersey judgment, you become a New Jersey judgment creditor and you may decide to do nothing or more likely, you may decide to try to collect it. To collect a special civil part New Jersey judgment, special civil part officers may be of assistance in taking steps to collect it, but they cannot provide legal advice. To collect a Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part New Jersey judgment, you must often use a sheriff. Normally, to collect on a New Jersey judgment, you need to know the whereabouts of the debtor’s assets and you need to fill out paperwork to direct the New Jersey Court officer to try to recover the New Jersey judgment from those assets. The collection process is often difficult and if a debtor files for bankruptcy, you may never collect your New Jersey judgment. The New Jersey Court normally has forms available at the New Jersey Courthouse and on the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey Employment Contract case attorney perform the steps necessary to collect any New Jersey judgment.

WHAT IF A DEFAULT AND/OR NEW JERSEY DEFAULT JUDGMENT IS ENTERED AGAINST YOU OR YOUR NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE AND YOU STILL WANT A NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE TRIAL?
If a default and/or New Jersey default judgment was entered against you or your New Jersey employment, you may seek to remove it, called “vacating the New Jersey default” or “vacating the New Jersey default judgment”. To vacate either, you must normally prepare a written motion and file the motion with the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part asking that the New Jersey default and/or New Jersey default judgment be vacated. The New Jersey Court normally has forms available at the New Jersey Courthouse and on the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey Employment Contract case attorney perform the steps necessary to prepare the proper motion. If you ignore the New Jersey default, it may lead to the entry of a New Jersey judgment against you or your New Jersey employment. If you ignore a New Jersey judgment, your bank account may be frozen and money in it turned over to the New Jersey judgment holder, some of your wages may be taken from you, your personal property may be seized by the sheriff and sold to satisfy the New Jersey judgment and/or a lien may be put against a house you own.

TAKING NEW JERSEY APPEALS -- WHAT IF I LOSE MY NEW JERSEY EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT CASE TRIAL OR THE NEW JERSEY COURT REFUSES TO VACATE A NEW JERSEY DEFAULT JUDGMENT?
If you are involved in a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit and you lose a summary New Jersey judgment motion, lose a New Jersey motion to vacate a New Jersey default judgment or lose a New Jersey trial, it could mean the dismissal of your lawsuit forever and it could prevent you from ever recovering money damages against a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant who you believe owes you money. If you are a New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit defendant and you lose, it could mean the entry of a money New Jersey judgment against you and the beginning of the New Jersey Employment Contract plaintiff’s efforts to collect the New Jersey judgment from you by freezing your bank accounts, attaching your wages, putting a lien on your home and forcing you to New Jersey Employment Contract lawsuit answer detailed questions about your finances. If you disagree with the New Jersey Court’s decision, you may file papers for the New Jersey Court to reconsider its decision – called a New Jersey motion for reconsideration. In some New Jersey Employment Contract cases, the motion for reconsideration must be made in 20 days from the date of the New Jersey Court’s order deciding the summary New Jersey judgment motion. If you disagree with the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Law Division, Civil Part's decision, such as a New Jersey judgment entered against you at New Jersey trial or the denial of a New Jersey motion to vacate a New Jersey default judgment, you may New Jersey appeal the New Jersey Employment Contract case to a higher court -- the Appellate Division of the Superior Court. There are very strict deadlines for filing New Jersey appeals. To New Jersey appeal a final New Jersey judgment that resolves all issues in the New Jersey Employment Contract case, you may file a notice of New Jersey appeal and other required New Jersey Employment Contract case documents with the Appellate Division within 45 days from the date of New Jersey judgment and pay a fee to the Appellate Division – special civil part New Jersey appeals and Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part New Jersey appeals are not heard by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Special Civil Part or Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Civil Part and you should not try to file appellate papers with either of those courts! As part of your New Jersey appeal, you usually must also prepare a written court transcript request and order a New Jersey court transcript from the appropriate court that decided the matter against you or your New Jersey employment and pay a fee for it. New Jersey appeals are some of the most complex proceedings in the New Jersey Court system. The New Jersey Court normally has forms available on the worldwide web. However, neither New Jersey court forms, websites nor advice from court personnel are good substitutes for a New Jersey attorney’s legal services. Each New Jersey Employment Contract case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey Employment Contract case attorney perform the steps necessary to take an New Jersey appeal. New Jersey appeals from orders or New Jersey judgments that are not final are called “interlocutory New Jersey appeals” and the procedure for such New Jersey appeals is somewhat different than those for New Jersey appeals from final New Jersey judgments or orders.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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