Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

Lemon Dictionary

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The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

NEW JERSEY LEMON LAW DICTIONARY

Administrative lemon law hearing – The Office of Administrative Law (OAL) conducts hearings in certain new and New Jersey used car lemon law cases. A New Jersey Administrative Law Judge hears contested New Jersey Lemon Law cases, such as certain new and used lemon law disputes, under New Jersey rules established by law and by the OAL. The New Jersey Administrative Law Judge provides a neutral forum where the evidence of all parties to a New Jersey Lemon case is presented. The New Jersey Administrative Law Judge is not permitted to give legal advice to consumers involved in contested New Jersey Lemon Law cases. After hearing a lemon case, the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge prepares an initial decision that is sent to the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs within the time frame set by law. The Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs may affirm, modify or reject the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge’s decision and the Director is empowered to make a final New Jersey Lemon Law decision in the matter. If the Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs fails to either adopt, reject or modify the initial decision within forty-five days (and unless the period is extended as provided by law), the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge’s initial decision becomes the final New Jersey Lemon Law decision for the New Jersey Lemon case. At that point, it may be possible for a party to the New Jersey Lemon case to take a New Jersey appeal to a higher court. During the administrative hearing, consumers are entitled to be represented by a New Jersey attorney. In most administrative lemon law hearings involving manufacturers, the manufacturers are represented by a New Jersey attorney and often, the manufacturer has at least one expert witness appear to dispute a New Jersey buyer’s lemon law claims.

Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) – A New Jersey judge that sits in the Office of Administrative Law (OAL). A New Jersey Administrative Law Judge hears contested New Jersey Lemon Law cases, such as certain new and used lemon law disputes, under New Jersey rules established by statute and by the OAL. The New Jersey Administrative Law Judge provides a neutral forum where the evidence of all parties to a New Jersey Lemon case is presented. The New Jersey Administrative Law Judge is not permitted to give legal advice to consumers involved in contested New Jersey Lemon Law cases. After hearing a lemon case, the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge prepares an initial decision that is sent to the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs within the time frame set by law. The Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs may affirm, modify or reject the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge’s decision and the Director is empowered to make a final New Jersey Lemon Law decision in the matter. If the Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs fails to either adopt, reject or modify the initial decision within forty-five days (and unless the period is extended as provided by law), the New Jersey Administrative Law Judge’s initial decision becomes the final New Jersey Lemon Law decision for the New Jersey Lemon case. At that point, it may be possible for a party to the New Jersey Lemon case to take a New Jersey appeal to a higher court.

Arbitration -- Under the New Jersey new car Lemon Law, if the manufacturer has its own New Jersey lemon dispute settlement or arbitration program, the New Jersey car buyer does not have to participate in it before filing a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit against the manufacturer. Even if the New Jersey car buyer decides to participate in such a program, if dissatisfied with the result, the New Jersey car buyer may be able to file a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit against the manufacturer. However, by deciding to proceed with a New Jersey Lemon Law arbitration process before filing a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit, many people waste much time and effort that could be better spent proceeding with a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit. Often, New Jersey new car Lemon Law dispute resolution programs increase rather than decrease the time it takes to resolve a New Jersey case.

Better Business Bureau Autoline – Founded in 1978, it is an auto warranty dispute resolution program. Some automotive manufacturers are members of the program, which attempts to resolve some but not all types of lemon disputes. For, many auto warranty disputes do not qualify for the program. The program’s proceedings are governed by over fifteen different New Jersey rules and involve telephone conferences facilitated by BBB staff and arbitrations of disputes not resolved by agreement. When pursuing BBB claims, consumers are entitled to be represented by a New Jersey attorney.

Breach of contract – a New Jersey breach of warranty is a type of New Jersey legal claim against a person or business for their failure to honor an oral or written contract.

Breach of warranty – a New Jersey breach of warranty is a type of New Jersey legal claim against a person or business for their failure to honor an express or implied warranty. A common type of breach of warranty claim involves a product’s manufacturer or the selling dealer who provided a warranty with the product or for which a warranty arose by law is unable or unwilling to provide goods that conform to the warranty.

Consumer -- A term used in the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act. A New Jersey buyer (other than for purposes of resale) of the vehicle or other consumer product, a person to whom the vehicle or product was transferred during the duration of an implied or written warranty (or service contract) applicable to the vehicle or product, or any other person entitled by the terms of such warranty (or service contract) or under applicable State law to enforce against the warrantor (or service contractor) the obligations of the warranty (or service contract).

Consumer (New Jersey new car Lemon Law) -- a New Jersey buyer or lessee, other than for purposes of resale or sublease, of a motor vehicle; a person to whom a motor vehicle is transferred during the duration of a warranty applicable to the motor vehicle; or any other person entitled by the terms of the warranty to enforce the obligations of the warranty.

Consumer product – A term used in the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act. A New Jersey buyer product is a new or used piece of merchandise that is distributed in commerce and normally used for personal, family, or household purposes, such as vehicles, mobile homes, computers, appliances, agricultural products, heating and air conditioning systems, plumbing components, etc.

Covered item -- Includes the following components of a used motor vehicle: Engine--all internal lubricated parts, timing chains, gears and cover, timing belt, pulleys and cover, oil pump and gears, water pump, valve covers, oil pan, manifolds, flywheel, harmonic balancer, engine mounts, seals and gaskets, and turbo-charger housing; however, housing, engine block and cylinder heads are covered items only if damaged by the failure of an internal lubricated part. Transmission Automatic/Transfer Case--all internal lubricated parts, torque converter, vacuum modulator, transmission mounts, seals and gaskets. Transmission Manual/Transfer Case--all internal lubricated parts, transmission mounts, seals and gaskets, but excluding a manual clutch, pressure plate, throw-out bearings, clutch master or slave cylinders. Front-Wheel Drive--all internal lubricated parts, axle shafts, constant velocity joints, front hub bearings, seals and gaskets, Rear-Wheel Drive--all internal lubricated parts, propeller shafts, supports and U-joints, axle shafts and bearings, seals and gaskets.

Dealer (New Jersey new car Lemon Law) -- A person who is actively engaged in the business of buying, selling or exchanging motor vehicles at retail and who has an established place of business.

Dealer (New Jersey used car Lemon Law) -- A person, including a business, selling or offering for sale a used motor vehicle after selling or offering for sale 3 or more used motor vehicles in the previous 12 month period. The term also applies to a lessor who is a dealer and who sells or offers for sale a used passenger motor vehicle, subject to a motor vehicle lease agreement which was in effect for more than 90 days, to a New Jersey buyer who is not the lessee, or a family member or employee of the lessee upon the termination of the lease agreement.

Deduction for personal use (New Jersey used car Lemon Law) -- The mileage allowance set by the federal Internal Revenue Service for business usage of a motor vehicle in effect on the date a used motor vehicle is repurchased by a dealer in accordance with N.J.S.A. 56:8-71, multiplied by the total number of miles a used motor vehicle is driven by a New Jersey buyer from the date of purchase of that vehicle until the time of its repurchase.

Defect – Under the New Jersey new car Lemon Law, the term “defect” means a problem that substantially impairs the vehicle’s use, value or safety to the purchaser and that is not of a trivial nature (which is subject to interpretation by a legal factfinder) and which is unable to be fixed by the manufacturer’s authorized dealer after a reasonable number of repair attempts; or which causes the vehicle to be out of service for 20 or more cumulative days.

Deficiency action -- A type of New Jersey legal claim. Most deficiency actions arise when a purchaser of a product finances the purchase of the product and thereafter fails to make payments on the loan when they are due to the lender. If someone is in default of a loan and the loan is secured by collateral, such as a vehicle, the lender may have the right to declare the loan in default, repossess the product, sell it at an auction (where the lender usually sells for the product that is far less than its original purchase price) and then sues the borrower for the difference. Such a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit often includes attorney’s fees, costs of sale, towing costs and lawsuit costs and it is therefore common for a lender to seek a sum of money much higher than the product’s original purchase price. It is generally very, very risky for a New Jersey buyer to decide to stop making payments on a vehicle simply because it doesn’t work well or even if it doesn’t work at all. Failing to make payments on a vehicle could result in: (1) the credit of everyone on the vehicle’s loan being damaged; (2) the vehicle being repossessed; (3) everyone on the vehicle’s loan being sued; (4) ultimately, in a money judgment being entered against you, which may even exceed the vehicle original price. Failing to make payments on the vehicle’s loan could make a bad situation much, much worse. Always consult with a New Jersey attorney before deciding to stop making payments on a vehicle loan.

Director -- The Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and Public Safety, or their designee.

Division -- The New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs in the Department of Law and Public Safety.

Excessive wear and tear -- Wear or damage to a used motor vehicle beyond that expected to be incurred in normal circumstances.

Lease agreement -- A contract or other written agreement in the form of a lease for the use of a motor vehicle by a person for a period of time exceeding 60 days, whether or not the lessee has the option to purchase or otherwise become the owner of the motor vehicle at the expiration of the lease.

Lemon -- A "lemon" vehicle or product is one that exhibits a substantial problem or problems following repair attempts made to it. For new vehicles, contrary to much misinformation spread amongst consumers, a vehicle does not necessarily have to be out of service for 20 or more days or undergo a certain number of repairs to qualify as a lemon.

Lemon law – A law that provides relief to the purchasers of certain defective vehicles or other products, frequently after the vehicle has undergone a number of unsuccessful repair attempts or been at a repair shop for a certain number of days undergoing repairs or waiting to be repaired. New Jersey’s lawmakers decided that the public should be protected from lemon vehicles by having a right to sue the manufacturers of lemon vehicles (New Jersey new car purchasers) or dealers of New Jersey used cars (New Jersey used car purchasers) or the manufacturers of lemon motorized wheelchairs or scooters (wheelchair purchasers) for a refund of the vehicle’s purchase or lease price, less deductions for how many miles the defective vehicle had when the defect was first reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealership and for wear and tear. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties apply only against manufacturers -- persons engaged in the business of manufacturing, assembling or distributing motor vehicles, who will, under normal business conditions during the year, manufacture, assemble or distribute to dealers at least 10 new motor vehicles. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties do not apply to dealers -- persons who actively engaged in the business of buying, selling or exchanging motor vehicles at retail and who have established places of business.

Lemon Law Unit (LLU)– A department of the New Jersey Office of Attorney General, Department of Law and Public Safety, Division of Consumer Affairs. The Lemon Law Unit does not provide consumers with legal representation and does not handle all types of warranty disputes involving vehicles.

Lemon lawyer – A New Jersey attorney that handles lemon law claims. In New Jersey, it is unethical for a lawyer to claim that he is an “expert” in handling lemon law claims, since there is no certification program currently offered by New Jersey’s Supreme Courts for lemon attorneys.

Lessee -- a person who leases a motor vehicle pursuant to a lease agreement .

Lessor -- a person who holds title to a motor vehicle leased to a lessee under a lease agreement or who holds the lessor's rights under such an agreement.

Lien – a security interest in a motor vehicle.

Lienholder -- means a person with a security interest in a motor vehicle pursuant to a lien.

Magnuson-Moss Warranty-Federal Trade Commission Improvement Act – Also known as the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, it is a federal law designed to help in the enforcement of breach of warranty claims. The Federal Government decided that, since warranties were difficult to enforce, it should be easier for the public to enforce certain warranties and service contracts by having a right to sue those who give and then fail to honor warranties or service contracts for money damages, attorney’s fees and court costs.

Manufacturer – Under the New Jersey new car Lemon Law, manufacturers are persons or businesses engaged in the business of manufacturing, assembling or distributing motor vehicles, who will, under normal business conditions during the year, manufacture, assemble or distribute to dealers at least 10 new motor vehicles. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties apply only against manufacturers and do not apply to dealers -- persons who actively engaged in the business of buying, selling or exchanging motor vehicles at retail and who have established places of business.

Manufacturer's informal dispute settlement procedure -- A New Jersey Lemon Law arbitration process or procedure by which the manufacturer attempts to resolve New Jersey disputes with New Jersey consumers regarding motor vehicle nonconformities and repairs that arise during the vehicle's warranty period. It is not a mandatory procedure and participation in the procedure may serve merely to delay a New Jersey buyer’s recovery or the resolution of a claim.

Manufacturer's warranty or warranty -- Any warranty, whether express or implied of the manufacturer, of a new motor vehicle of its condition and fitness for use, including any terms or conditions precedent to the enforcement of obligations under the warranty.

Material defect (New Jersey used car Lemon Law) -- A malfunction of a New Jersey used motor vehicle, subject to a warranty, which substantially impairs its use, value or safety.

Motor vehicle -- A passenger automobile or motorcycle as defined in N.J.S.A. 39:1-1 which is purchased or leased in the State of New Jersey or which is registered by the New Jersey Division of Motor Vehicles in the Department of Law and Public Safety, except the living facilities of motor homes.

New Jersey new car Lemon Law -- A law that provides relief to the purchasers of certain defective vehicles frequently after the vehicle has undergone a number of unsuccessful repair attempts by the manufacturer’s dealership or been at the manufacturer’s dealership for a certain number of days undergoing repairs or waiting to be repaired. A vehicle does not necessarily have to be out of service for 20 or more days or undergo a certain number of repairs for the owner to have a valid New Jersey used car Lemon Law claim. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law also requires manufacturers to handle certain repairs and other functions according to New Jersey law’s requirements or face penalties. New Jersey’s lawmakers decided that, since New Jersey new cars were expensive to buy and lease, the public should be protected from lemon vehicles by having a right to sue the manufacturers of lemon vehicles for a refund of the vehicle’s purchase or lease price, less deductions for how many miles the defective vehicle had when the defect was first reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealership and for wear and tear. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties apply only against manufacturers -- persons engaged in the business of manufacturing, assembling or distributing motor vehicles, who will, under normal business conditions during the year, manufacture, assemble or distribute to dealers at least 10 new motor vehicles. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties do not apply to dealers -- persons who actively engaged in the business of buying, selling or exchanging motor vehicles at retail and who have established places of business. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties apply only against manufacturers -- persons engaged in the business of manufacturing, assembling or distributing motor vehicles, who will, under normal business conditions during the year, manufacture, assemble or distribute to dealers at least 10 new motor vehicles. The New Jersey new car Lemon Law’s penalties do not apply to dealers -- persons who actively engaged in the business of buying, selling or exchanging motor vehicles at retail and who have established places of business.

Nonconformity -- a defect or condition which substantially impairs the use, value or safety of a motor vehicle.

Office of Administrative Law (OAL) – An agency of the executive branch established in1979 to act as an independent reviewer of certain disputes arising from agency actions and to act as an independent reviewer court for agency compliance with rulemaking procedures. The Office of Administrative Law’s director, who is also New Jersey’s Chief New Jersey Administrative Law Judge, presides over the Office of Administrative Law and reports directly to the Governor. The Office of Administrative Law is responsible for handling certain types of administrative hearings, including lemon law disputes that qualify as contested New Jersey Lemon Law cases. However, the Office of Administrative Law does not provide consumers with legal representation and does not hear all types of warranty disputes involving vehicles. If a New Jersey agency determines that a new or New Jersey used car lemon law dispute meets the requirements for a contested case, a state agency transmits the contested case to the OAL. Consumers do not apply directly to the OAL for a hearing. A New Jersey Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) hears the contested case under New Jersey rules established by statute and by the OAL. The ALJ provides a neutral forum where the evidence of all parties to a New Jersey Lemon case is presented. The ALJ, as a full time officer of the OAL, is not permitted to hold other employment. He or she is appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the New Jersey Senate for a one-year term. After this initial term, the Governor may reappoint the ALJ to a four-year term. Any subsequent reappointment is to a five-year term and requires Senate confirmation.

Reasonable allowance for vehicle use -- the mileage at the time the New Jersey consumer first presents the motor vehicle to the New Jersey dealer or manufacturer for correction of a nonconformity times the purchase price, or the lease price if applicable, of the vehicle, divided by one hundred thousand miles.

Repair insurance -- a contract in writing to refund, repair, replace, maintain or take other action with respect to a used motor vehicle for any period of time or any specified mileage and provided at an extra charge beyond the price of the used motor vehicle.

Revocation of acceptance – A New Jersey buyer’s rejection of a vehicle or product. Under the New Jersey Uniform Commercial Code, in certain situations, a New Jersey buyer of a defective vehicle or product, including items that do not meet the terms of any warranties issued with the vehicle or product (or arising as a matter of law), may revoke acceptance of the vehicle or product due to defects. Before filing a New Jersey Lemon Law lawsuit or demanding arbitration, you may have to make a specific and proper revocation of acceptance demand for the seller of a product or issuer of a warranty or service contract associated with a product to provide you legal relief. To make certain that the demand takes the correct form, you should have a New Jersey attorney prepare this demand for you.

Service contract -- a contract in writing to refund, repair, replace, maintain or take other action with respect to a used motor vehicle for any period of time or any specific mileage or provided at an extra charge beyond the price of the used motor vehicle.

New Jersey used car Lemon Law -- A New Jersey Lemon Law that provides relief to the purchasers of certain defective used vehicles, frequently after the vehicle has undergone a number of unsuccessful repair attempts or been at a repair shop for a certain number of days undergoing repairs or waiting to be repaired. A vehicle does not necessarily have to be out of service for 20 or more days or undergo a certain number of repairs for the owner to have a valid New Jersey used car Lemon Law claim. The New Jersey used car Lemon Law also requires dealers to handle the sale of used vehicles and other functions according to New Jersey law’s requirements or face penalties. New Jersey’s lawmakers decided that, when buying certain New Jersey used cars, the public should be protected from lemon vehicles by having a right to recover from the selling dealers a refund of the vehicle’s purchase price, less a deduction for sales taxes, title and registration fees or other similar government charges, a reasonable allowance for any excessive wear and tear and a deduction for personal use. Under New Jersey’s New Jersey used car Lemon Law, New Jersey used car dealers must provide buyers of certain used vehicles purchased after July 3, 1996 with warranties. In addition, the New Jersey used car Lemon Law prohibits New Jersey used car dealers from engaging in certain types of conduct regardless of whether the purchaser is entitled to a warranty.

Used motor vehicle – Under the New Jersey Lemon Law for used cars, A passenger motor vehicle, excluding motorcycles, motor homes and off-road vehicles, title to, or possession of which has been transferred from the person who first acquired it from the manufacturer or dealer, and so used as to become what is commonly known as "secondhand," within the ordinary meaning thereof but does not mean a passenger motor vehicle, subject to a motor vehicle lease agreement which was in effect for more than 90 days, which is sold by the lessor to the lessee, or to a family member or employee of the lessee upon the termination of the lease agreement.

Warranty -- Any undertaking in connection with the sale of a vehicle, to refund, repair, replace, maintain or take other action with respect to the vehicle and which is provided at no extra charge beyond the price of the vehicle. New Jersey new cars are normally sold with written warranties. Some New Jersey used cars are supposed to be sold with written warranties.

Wheelchair Lemon Law -- A "lemon" vehicle is one that exhibits a substantial problem or problems following repair attempts made to it. Motorized wheelchairs and scooters can cost up to $20,000.00. Accordingly, New Jersey’s lawmakers decided that the public should be protected from lemon motorized wheelchairs and scooters by having a right to sue the vehicle’s manufacturer for a refund of the vehicle’s purchase or lease price, less a reasonable use allowance deduction. Under New Jersey’s Wheelchair Lemon Law, manufacturers must provide the New Jersey car buyers of wheelchairs and scooters a minimum warranty of 1 year beginning from the time of delivery for defects or conditions impairing the vehicle’s value and follow other requirements of the New Jersey Wheelchair Lemon Law.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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