Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

Mediation

Read below to learn more about this topic.

Or, to receive a no cost phone consultation about what the Law Office of Paul DePetris might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris at paul@newjerseylemon.com.

The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

WHAT IS NEW JERSEY MEDIATION IN NEW JERSEY COURT CASES?
New Jersey mediation is a New Jersey complimentary New Jersey lawsuit resolution program used in certain New Jersey cases. New Jersey complementary New Jersey lawsuit resolution programs constitute an integral part of the New Jersey Court process, intended to enhance its quality and efficacy. In many New Jersey cases heard in the New Jersey Court, before the New Jersey Court trial occurs the New Jersey Court requires the New Jersey plaintiff and New Jersey defendant to mediate their New Jersey lawsuit. New Jersey mediation is an informal New Jersey Court hearing normally held in a conference room. You and the other New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant and any attorneys involved in the New Jersey case appear at the New Jersey mediation. Accordingly, the New Jersey mediator attempts to resolve the New Jersey case by suggesting a possible settlement to both New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants. Note that New Jersey Court cases do not always undergo New Jersey mediation hearings.

WHO DECIDES TO SEND OR REFER A NEW JERSEY CASE TO A NEW JERSEY MEDIATION HEARING?
Except as otherwise provided by the New Jersey Court Rules, a New Jersey Court judge may require the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants to attend a New Jersey mediation hearing at any time following the filing of a New Jersey complaint. The New Jersey Court may, on the New Jersey Court’s own initiative and by written order, refer any New Jersey civil case, New Jersey general equity case, or New Jersey probate action case to New Jersey mediation for an initial two hours, which shall include an organizational telephone conference, preparation by the New Jersey mediator, and the first New Jersey mediation hearing. In addition, the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants to a New Jersey lawsuit may request a New Jersey Court referral order to New Jersey mediation and may either select the New Jersey mediator or request the New Jersey Court to designate a New Jersey mediator from the New Jersey Court-approved roster.

WHO SERVES AS THE NEW JERSEY MEDIATOR?
The New Jersey mediation is conducted by a neutral New Jersey Court appointed New Jersey mediator. A New Jersey mediator is a person trained to attempt to resolve New Jersey lawsuits between New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants by sitting down with them and mediating their New Jersey settlement. The New Jersey mediator is trained in resolving New Jersey lawsuits through the process of New Jersey mediation. Unless otherwise specified by the New Jersey Court Rules, no special occupational status or educational degree is required for New Jersey mediator service and New Jersey mediation training. An applicant for listing on a roster of New Jersey mediators maintained by either the Administrative Office of the New Jersey Courts or the New Jersey Assignment Judge shall, however, certify to good professional standing. An applicant whose professional license has been revoked shall not be placed on the roster, or if already on the roster shall be removed therefrom. New Jersey mediator applicants for civil, general equity, and probate actions shall have at least five years of professional experience in the field of their expertise, as well as either an advanced degree or an undergraduate degree, coupled in both cases with New Jersey mediation experience. For purposes of the applicable New Jersey Court Rule, an advanced degree means a juris doctor or equivalent; an advanced degree in business, finance, or accounting, an advanced degree in the field of expertise in which the applicant will practice New Jersey mediation, for example, engineering, architecture, or mental health; or state licensure in the field of expertise, for example, certified public accountant, architect, or engineer. For purposes of the applicable New Jersey Court Rule, New Jersey mediation experience which, together with an advanced degree, will qualify an applicant means evidence of successful New Jersey mediation of a minimum of two cases within the last year, provided however that New Jersey mediation experience is waived if New Jersey mediation training was completed within the last five years. For purposes of the applicable New Jersey Court Rule, New Jersey mediation experience which, together with an undergraduate degree, will qualify an applicant means evidence of successful New Jersey mediation of a minimum of ten cases involving subject matter otherwise cognizable in the Superior New Jersey Court within the last five years. All persons serving as New Jersey mediators shall have completed the basic New Jersey lawsuit resolution training course as prescribed by the New Jersey Court Rules and approved by the Administrative Office of the New Jersey Courts. Volunteer New Jersey mediators in the Special Civil Part and Municipal New Jersey mediators shall have completed 18 classroom hours of basic New Jersey mediation skills complying with the requirements of the applicable New Jersey Court Rule. New Jersey mediators on the New Jersey civil court, New Jersey general equity court, and New Jersey probate court roster of the Superior New Jersey Court shall have completed 18 classroom hours of basic New Jersey mediation skills complying with the requirements of the applicable New Jersey Court Rules and at least five hours being mentored by an experienced New Jersey mediator on the roster in accordance with guidelines promulgated by the Administrative Office of the New Jersey Courts in at least two cases in the Superior New Jersey Court. Individuals may obtain a waiver of the mentoring requirement from the Administrative Office of the New Jersey Courts on the successful demonstration that they have previously served as a New Jersey mediator in at least five cases under R. 1:40-4 or comparable New Jersey mediation program or have satisfactorily completed at least 10 hours in an approved advanced New Jersey mediation course. Judicial law clerks shall have successfully completed 12 classroom hours of basic New Jersey mediation skills complying with the requirements of the applicable New Jersey Court Rule. Commencing in the year following the completion of the basic training course or the waiver thereof, all New Jersey mediators shall annually attend four hours of continuing education and shall file with the Administrative Office of the New Jersey Courts or the New Jersey Assignment Judge, as appropriate, an annual certification of compliance. To meet the requirement, this continuing education shall include instruction in ethical issues associated with New Jersey mediation practice, program guidelines and/or case management and should cover at least one of the following: (A) reinforcing and enhancing New Jersey mediation and negotiation concepts and skills, (B) other professional matters related to New Jersey mediation. New Jersey mediators who have been approved to serve as mentors under the applicable New Jersey Court Rules may apply the time spent mentoring to satisfy this requirement. Within 14 days after entry of the New Jersey mediation referral order, the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants may select a New Jersey mediator, who may, but need not, be listed on the New Jersey Court's Roster of Civil New Jersey mediators. Lead New Jersey plaintiff's counsel in the New Jersey case must in writing provide the New Jersey Complimentary Dispute Resolution Point Person in the New Jersey county court, as well as the individual designated by the New Jersey Court in the New Jersey mediation referral order, with the name of the selected New Jersey mediator. If the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants do not timely select a New Jersey mediator, the individual designated by the New Jersey Court in the New Jersey mediation referral order shall serve. All New Jersey mediators on the New Jersey Court's roster as well as those not on the roster, whether New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant-selected or New Jersey Court-designated, shall comply with the terms and conditions set forth in the New Jersey mediation referral order.


NEW JERSEY MEDIATOR’S DUTIES TO DISCLOSE CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
Before accepting a New Jersey mediation, a person who is requested to serve as a New Jersey mediator shall: (A) make an inquiry that is reasonable under the circumstances to determine whether there are any known facts that a reasonable person would consider likely to affect the impartiality of the New Jersey mediator, including a financial or personal interest in the outcome of the New Jersey mediation or an existing or past relationship with a New Jersey mediation New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant or foreseeable participant in the New Jersey mediation; and (B) disclose any such known fact to the New Jersey mediation New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants as soon as is practicable before accepting a New Jersey mediation. If a New Jersey mediator learns any disqualification fact described in the New Jersey Court Rules after accepting a New Jersey mediation, the New Jersey mediator shall disclose it as soon as is practicable. After entry of the New Jersey mediation referral order in an economic New Jersey mediation, if the New Jersey Court is advised by the New Jersey mediator, counsel, or one of the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that a conflict of interest exists, the New Jersey Court shall reassign the case to a different New Jersey mediator. The New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants shall have the opportunity to select a replacement New Jersey mediator from the roster or the New Jersey Court may appoint one. An amended New Jersey mediation order of referral shall then be prepared and provided to the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants.

WHO PAYS FOR THE NEW JERSEY MEDIATOR’S SERVICES?
New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants in Superior New Jersey Court, except in the Special Civil Part, assigned to New Jersey mediation pursuant to the applicable New Jersey Court Rule shall equally share the fees and expenses of the New Jersey mediator on an ongoing basis, subject to New Jersey Court review and allocation to create equity. Any fee or expense of the New Jersey mediator shall be waived in cases, as to those New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants exempt, pursuant to Rule 1:13-2(a). A New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant may opt out of the New Jersey mediation process after the New Jersey mediator has expended two hours of service, which shall be allocated equally between preparation and the first New Jersey mediation hearing, and which shall be at no cost to the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants. Fees shall be as determined by the New Jersey mediator and the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants. Failure to pay the New Jersey mediator may result in an order by the New Jersey Court to pay the fees and costs of the New Jersey mediator including any additional costs and fees incurred due to the non-payment and imposing appropriate sanctions.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF CERTAIN COMMUNICATIONS DURING THE NEW JERSEY MEDIATION PROCESS
Unless the participants in a New Jersey mediation agree otherwise or to the extent disclosure is permitted by the applicable New Jersey Court Rule, no New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant, New Jersey mediator, or other participant in a New Jersey mediation may disclose any New Jersey mediation communication to anyone who was not a participant in the New Jersey mediation. A New Jersey mediator may disclose a New Jersey mediation communication to prevent harm to others to the extent such New Jersey mediation communication would be admissible in a New Jersey Court proceeding. A New Jersey mediator has the duty to disclose to a proper authority information obtained at a New Jersey mediation hearing if required by law or if the New Jersey mediator has a reasonable belief that such disclosure will prevent a participant from committing a criminal or illegal act likely to result in death or serious bodily harm. No New Jersey mediator may appear as counsel for any person in the same or any related matter. A New Jersey lawyer representing a client at a New Jersey mediation hearing shall be governed by the provisions of the applicable New Jersey Rules of Professional Conduct.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY TELEPHONIC CONFERENCE AND NEW JERSEY MEDIATION STATEMENT?
The New Jersey mediator shall fix a date following the New Jersey mediation telephonic conference for the exchange by the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants and service upon the New Jersey mediator of a brief New Jersey mediation statement of facts and proposals for settlement not exceeding ten pages. At the discretion of the New Jersey mediator, each New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant's statement of facts may be prepared and submitted to the New Jersey mediator for review without service of the New Jersey mediation statement of facts on the other New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant. All New Jersey mediation documents prepared for New Jersey mediation shall be confidential and subject to Rule 1:40-4(c) and (d).

WHAT HAPPENS DURING THE NEW JERSEY MEDIATION HEARING?
New Jersey mediation proceedings shall commence with an opening statement by the New Jersey mediator describing the purpose and procedures of the process. New Jersey mediators may require the participation of persons with negotiating authority. An attorney or other individual designated by a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant may accompany the New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant to and participate in the New Jersey mediation hearing. A waiver of representation or participation given before the New Jersey mediation may be rescinded. Non-New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant witnesses may be heard in the discretion of the New Jersey mediator, and other non-New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants shall be permitted to attend only with the consent of the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants and the New Jersey mediator. Multiple New Jersey mediation hearings may be scheduled. New Jersey attorneys and New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants have an obligation to participate in the New Jersey mediation process in good faith in accordance with New Jersey mediation program guidelines. The New Jersey mediator or a participant may terminate the New Jersey mediation hearing if: (A) there is an imbalance of power between the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that the New Jersey mediator cannot overcome, (B) a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant challenges the impartiality of the New Jersey mediator, (C) there is abusive behavior that the New Jersey mediator cannot control, or (D) a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant continuously resists the New Jersey mediation process or the New Jersey mediator. The New Jersey mediator shall terminate the New Jersey mediation hearing if: (A) there is a failure of communication that seriously impedes effective discussion, (B) the New Jersey mediator believes a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant is under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or (C) the New Jersey mediator believes continued New Jersey mediation is inappropriate or inadvisable for any reason.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO SETTLE MY NEW JERSEY COURT CASE DURING A NEW JERSEY MEDIATION HEARING?
New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants may voluntarily agree to settle their New Jersey Court case but preparing the proper New Jersey settlement agreement requires great care. Each New Jersey Court case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. For example, what if you don’t include protections to yourself in the New Jersey agreement? A New Jersey Court may refuse to enforce a New Jersey settlement agreement if it is unclear what the New Jersey plaintiff and New Jersey defendant agreed to. Also, if a New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant fails to honor a New Jersey Court settlement, you may have to return to New Jersey Court if you want to enforce the New Jersey Court settlement, which normally requires you to file a New Jersey motion. If you can afford a New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare the New Jersey settlement agreement so that they can try to make the other New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants agree to the best New Jersey settlement terms for you. If the New Jersey mediation results in the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants' total or partial New Jersey settlement agreement, it shall be reduced to writing and a copy thereof furnished to each New Jersey plaintiff or New Jersey defendant. The New Jersey settlement agreement need not be filed with the New Jersey Court, but if formal proceedings have been stayed pending New Jersey mediation, the New Jersey mediator shall report to the New Jersey Court whether a New Jersey settlement agreement has been reached.

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE END OF THE NEW JERSEY MEDIATION HEARING?
Promptly upon termination of the New Jersey mediation process, the New Jersey mediator shall report to the New Jersey Court in writing as to whether or not the action or any severable claim therein has been settled. During the New Jersey mediation, none of the New Jersey plaintiff and New Jersey defendant is required to settle the New Jersey case. Indeed, one or all of the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants may not even make any offer to settle. If a New Jersey settlement agreement is not reached, the New Jersey case shall be referred back to New Jersey Court for formal disposition. If the New Jersey mediation is unsuccessful at settling the New Jersey case, the New Jersey case normally continues through the New Jersey Court system until the New Jersey case is dismissed or won or lost, such as by a New Jersey motion order or New Jersey trial verdict entered in either the New Jersey plaintiff’s favor or the New Jersey defendant’s favor. If the New Jersey Court case cannot be settled before the New Jersey Court trial and your New Jersey Court case is called to be tried, you must be prepared to present your New Jersey Court case or New Jersey defenses to the New Jersey court.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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