Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

New Jersey Real Estate Warranty Facts

Read below to learn more about this topic.

Or, to receive a no cost phone consultation about what the Law Office of Paul DePetris might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris at paul@newjerseylemon.com.

The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.


WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY REAL ESTATE BREACH OF WARRANTY UNDER NEW JERSEY WARRANTY LAW?
New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty lawsuits involve New Jersey homes, apartments or other New Jersey real estate. Usually, the case is one where a New Jersey home builder, New Jersey home improvement contractor, New Jersey home repair contractor, New Jersey home seller or New Jersey landlord made promises, either express or implied, about the quality of a new New Jersey home, used New Jersey home, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartment or New Jersey rental home and the promises are broken by the New Jersey home builder, New Jersey home improvement contractor, New Jersey home repair contractor, New Jersey home seller or New Jersey landlord.

WHAT ARE SOME COMMON TYPES OF NEW JERSEY REAL ESTATE BREACH OF WARRANTY LAWSUITS?
There are many varieties of New Jersey real estate breach of warranty lawsuits. The following are perhaps the most common types of New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty lawsuits:
1. New Jersey Express warranty.
2. New Jersey Implied warranty of good workmanship.
3. New Jersey Implied warranty of habitability.
4. New Jersey New Homeowners’ Warranty.
Whereas a New Jersey breach of contract claim normally requires the existence of a New Jersey contract between the New Jersey breach of contract lawsuit plaintiff and the New Jersey breach of contract defendant, a New Jersey warranty claim often does not.

TO PROVE A NEW JERSEY REAL ESTATE BREACH OF WARRANTY, MUST I ALWAYS PROVE THAT A DEFECT OR PROBLEM EXISTS OR THAT THE NEW JERSEY REAL ESTATE BREACH OF WARRANTY DEFENDANT COMMITTED NEGLIGENCE?
A common misconception about New Jersey real estate warranty lawsuits is that they require proof of the existence of a defect or negligence. In certain New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty cases, proof of a defect or negligence is unnecessary—failure of performance of a new New Jersey home, used New Jersey home, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartment or New Jersey rental home in the absence of secondary causes may be sufficient to prove a New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY REAH ESTATE BREACH OF EXPRESS WARRANTY
A New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Express Warranty claim may arise: (1) Under New Jersey judicially made law, called New Jersey common law, such as where a New Jersey express warranty is issued for services; or (2) under the New Jersey New Home Warranty and Builders’ Registration Act, which provides for New Jersey express warranties regarding the quality of new New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products or relative to checks or other negotiable instruments; or (3) under some New Jersey or Federal law other than the New Jersey New Home Warranty and Builders’ Registration Act.

The basic elements of a New Jersey real estate breach of express warranty are:
(1) The New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant was the recipient of or beneficiary under a New Jersey express oral or written warranty, including any affirmation of fact or promise made by the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant related to new New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products or services, which became part of the basis of the bargain that New New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products would conform to the affirmation or promise.
(2) New New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products or services did not conform to the warranty and/or the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant experienced problems with New New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products or services and/or New New Jersey homes, used New Jersey homes, New Jersey home repair services, New Jersey home improvement services, New Jersey apartments or New Jersey rental homes or other New Jersey products did
not perform as promised.
(3) In certain New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty cases, the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty was material rather than one for trivial nonconformities/problems.
(4) In certain New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty cases, the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff gave the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant an opportunity to cure the nonconformities/problems but the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant failed to cure those nonconformities/problems.
(5) In certain New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty cases, in a reasonable time after discovering the nonconformities/problems, the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff provided notice to the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant of the existence of those nonconformities/problems.
(6) In certain product warranty cases, such as where the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty defendant alleges secondary causes, the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff did not continue to make deliberate and unreasonable use of the product after becoming aware of the nonconformity/problem or the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff did not cause the problem or nonconformity by
abusing, misusing or modifying the product.
(7) The New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff suffered damages from the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty.

NEW JERESY HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTOR EXPRESS WARRANTIES AND NEW JERSEY HOME REPAIR CONTRACTOR EXPRESS WARRANTIES
Under New Jersey law, New Jersey home improvement contractors and New Jersey home repair contractors are often required to provide disclosures regarding express warranties issued with New Jersey home improvement services and New Jersey home repair services. Under the New Jersey Home Improvement Practices regulations, a New Jersey home improvement means the remodeling, altering, painting, repairing, renovating, restoring, moving, demolishing, or modernizing of residential or noncommercial property or the making of additions thereto, and includes, but is not limited to, the construction, installation, replacement, improvement, or repair of driveways, sidewalks, swimming pools, terraces, patios, landscaping, fences, porches, windows, doors, cabinets, kitchens, bathrooms, garages,
basements and basement waterproofing, fire protection devices, security protection devices,
central heating and air conditioning equipment, water softeners, heaters, and purifiers, solar
heating or water systems, insulation installation, siding, wall-to-wall carpeting or attached or
inlaid floor coverings, and other changes, repairs, or improvements made in or on, attached to or
forming a part of the residential or noncommercial property, but does not include the construction
of a new residence. The term extends to the conversion of existing commercial structures into residential or noncommercial property and includes any of the above activities performed under emergency conditions. Under the New Jersey Home Improvement Practices regulations, a New Jersey Home improvement contract means an oral or written agreement between a seller and an owner of residential or noncommercial property, or a seller and a tenant or lessee of residential or noncommercial property, if the tenant or lessee is to be obligated for the payment of home improvements made in, to, or upon such property, and includes all agreements under which the New Jersey home repair contractor or New Jersey home improvement contractor is to perform labor or render services for home improvements, or furnish materials in connection therewith. Under the New Jersey Home Improvement Practices regulations residential or non-commercial property means a structure used, in whole or in substantial part, as a home or place of residence by any natural person, whether or not a single or multi-unit structure, and that part of the lot or site on which it is situated and which is devoted to the residential use of the structure, and includes all appurtenant structures. Under the New Jersey Home Improvement Practices regulations, the New Jersey home repair contractor or New Jersey home improvement contractor shall furnish the New Jersey homeowner a written copy of all guarantees or warranties made with respect to labor services, products or materials furnished in connection with New Jersey home improvements. Such New Jersey home improvement contract guarantees or warranties shall be specific, clear and definite and shall include any exclusions or limitations as to their scope or duration. Copies of all New Jersey home improvement guarantees or warranties shall be furnished to the New Jersey homeowner at the time the New Jersey home repair contractor or New Jersey home improvement contractor presents his bid as well as at the time of execution of the New Jersey home improvement contract, except that separate guarantees
or warranties of the manufacturer of products or materials may be furnished at the time such
products or materials are installed.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY BREACH OF IMPLIED WARRANTY OF GOOD WORKMANSHIP?
It is not uncommon for parties to a service contract, such as a New Jersey home improvement contract or New Jersey home repair contract, to fail to state the New Jersey warranties, if any, associated with the New Jersey services rendered under the New Jersey contract. Also, a New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff may not have any guarantees as to work performed for another. For example, if a New Jersey home repair contractor provides services to a homeowner and the home is subsequently purchased by a third party, that party may not have any express guarantee for those services. When there is no express contractual provision concerning workmanship, the law implies a covenant that the New Jersey contract will be performed in a reasonably good and workmanlike manner. New Jersey warranties are imposed on service providers because they are often in a better position to prevent
the occurrence of major problems.

The basic elements of a New Jersey breach of the New Jersey implied warranty of good
workmanship are:
(1) The parties had a valid contract for the provision of services.
(2) There existed no valid exclusion or modification of the implicit promise that the New Jersey services will be performed in a workmanlike manner and/or that the result will be fit for its intended purpose.
(3) The New Jersey services rendered under the New Jersey contract were not performed in a workmanlike manner and/or the result was unfit for its intended purpose.
(4) The New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff suffered damages from the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY BREACH OF IMPLIED WARRANTY OF HABITABILITY?
In the absence of a New Jersey express warranty, a New Jersey buyer of a new New Jersey home or used New Jersey home may recover for defects in the New Jersey home associated with its
habitability. New Jersey residential leases also include implied warranties of habitability.

The basic elements of a New Jersey breach of the New Jersey implied warranty of
habitability are:
(1) The New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff purchased a new New Jersey home or used New Jersey home.
(2) Following sale, of the new New Jersey home or used New Jersey home the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff experienced one or more problems that affected facilities vital to the
use of the new New Jersey home or used New Jersey home for residential purposes.
(3) In appropriate New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty cases, the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff may also be obliged to rule out secondary causes, such as the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff’s abuse, misuse or modification causing the problems.
(4) If the New Jersey home is new, it was not constructed in a reasonably workmanlike manner and is unfit for the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiffs to live in.
(5) If the New Jersey home is used, it is unfit for the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiffs to live in.
(6) The New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty plaintiff suffered damages from the New Jersey Real Estate Breach of Warranty.

NEW JERSEY NEW HOME WARRANTIES UNDER THE NEW JERSEY NEW HOME WARRANTY AND BUILDER’S REGISTRATION ACT
New Jersey provides unique protection through the New Home Warranty and Builders' Registration Act, which establishes a program requiring that newly constructed New Jersey homes conform with certain construction and quality standards and provides New Jersey new home buyers with insurance-backed warranty protection in the event such standards are not met. In addition to authorizing New Jersey home warranty coverage through private insurance programs, the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act requires that a New Jersey new home warranty security fund be maintained by the New Jersey State Treasurer and administered by the New Jersey Commissioner of Community Affairs on behalf of New Jersey new home buyers. Moneys payable to the New Jersey new home warranty fund are solely for the purpose of paying proven New Jersey new home warranty claims, providing reasonable reserves, including appropriate forms of reinsurance, and covering the costs of New Jersey new home warranty program administration. Prior to making a claim against New Jersey New Home Warranty Fund for defects covered by New Jersey New Home Warranty, an owner shall notify the New Jersey builder of such defects and allow a reasonable time period for their repair. If the repairs are not made within a reasonable time or are not satisfactory to the New Jersey new homeowner, he may file a claim against New Jersey New Home Warranty Fund in the form and manner prescribed by the New Jersey Commissioner of Community Affairs. The New Jersey Commissioner of Community Affairs shall investigate each New Jersey New Home Warranty claim to determine the validity thereof, and the amount of the award that shall be made thereon, and shall hold a hearing if requested by either New Jersey New Home Warranty plaintiff or New Jersey New Home Warranty defendant, in accordance with the provisions of the "Administrative Procedure Act," P.L.1968, c.410 (C.52:14B-1 et seq.) applicable to contested cases. Reasonable New Jersey New Home Warranty hearing fees shall be assessed against the unsuccessful New Jersey New Home Warranty plaintiff or New Jersey New Home Warranty defendant. The amount of the New Jersey New Home Warranty award shall be sufficient to cover the reasonable costs necessary to correct any defect or defects covered under New Jersey New Home Warranty, but the total amount of New Jersey New Home Warranty awards from New Jersey New Home Warranty Fund for any new New Jersey home shall not exceed the purchase price of the new New Jersey home in the first good faith sale thereof or the fair market value on the new New Jersey home on its completion date if there is no good faith sale. All claims submitted by an owner shall first be reviewed through a conciliation or arbitration procedure by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, and in the event that the New Jersey new homeowner is found to be in the right, then the New Jersey builder shall be required to correct such claims as determined through the conciliation or arbitration procedure. If a New Jersey builder is unable or willfully refuses to correct such deficiency, then an amount sufficient to cure the problem shall be paid from New Jersey New Home Warranty Fund to the New Jersey new homeowner. In such cases, the New Jersey Commissioner of Community Affairs may then proceed against the New Jersey builder in accordance with subsection b. of section 6 of P.L.1977, c.467 (C.46:3B-6). Upon certification from the New Jersey Commissioner of Community Affairs of the amount of a New Jersey New Home Warranty award, The New Jersey State Treasurer shall make payment to the claimant from New Jersey New Home Warranty Fund. BEFORE BRINING A CLAIM UNDER THE NEW JERSEY NEW HOME WARRANTY AND BUILDER’S REGISTRATION ACT, A HOMEOWNER SHOULD SERIOUSLY CONSIDER CONSUTING WITH A NEW JERSEY LICESENCED ATTORNEY ABOUT THE ELECTION OF REMEDIES UNDER THE NEW JERSEY NEW HOME WARRANTY AND BUILDER’S REGISTRATION ACT. OTHERWISE, THE NEW NEW JERSEY HOMEOWNER MAY MAKE THE MISTAKE OF GIVING UP CERTAIN LEGAL RIGHTS THAT THE NEW NEW JERSEY HOMEOWNER HAS AGAINST A NEW JERSEY BUILDER!!! New Jersey builders benefit from the election of remedies dilemma posed by the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act and its corresponding regulations. Under the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act, New Jersey home purchaser chooses either the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act arbitration or a New Jersey lawsuit against the New Jersey new home builder. Nothing contained in the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act shall affect other rights and remedies available to the New Jersey new homeowner. The New Jersey new homeowner shall have the opportunity to pursue any remedy legally available to the New Jersey new homeowner. However, initiation of procedures to enforce a remedy shall constitute an election which shall bar the New Jersey new homeowner from all other remedies. Nothing contained in the New Jersey New Home Warranty And Builders’ Registration Act shall be deemed to limit the New Jersey new homeowner's right of appeal as applicable to the remedy elected.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the New Jersey services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris.
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