Law Office Of Paul DePetris
paul@newjerseylemon.com

New Jersey Third Party Bad Faith Insurance Lawsuits

Read below to learn more about this topic.

Or, to receive a no cost phone consultation about what the Law Office of Paul DePetris might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris at paul@newjerseylemon.com.

The information in this article is only for New Jersey Law Division, Civil Part cases and not for other New Jersey court cases, such as those in New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court!!! Do not use this article if you have a New Jersey Special Civil Court, New Jersey Small Claims Court or New Jersey Chancery Court case!!! Also, no website is a substitute for competent advice from a New Jersey lawyer!

Warning – this article does not necessarily include each and every New Jersey court rule that may apply to your New Jersey case! The Law Office of Paul DePetris does not guarantee that the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website are the latest versions of the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms, that they lack typographical errors or that they have not been amended, repealed or superseded by other federal or state law. The New Jersey Statutes, United States Statutes, New Jersey Administrative Code and Federal Code in this database are not annotated. Accordingly, this database may include laws that: (1) never became operable due to unmet conditions; (2) expired; (3) were repealed or amended; (4) were declared void by a court of law; (5) or are otherwise invalid. Further, effective dates of the laws are not necessarily included in the database. Accordingly, you should not rely upon the statutes, rules, codes, files or forms on this website contained in this database for any purpose and before taking any legal measures, you instead should read all applicable federal and state source law and case law and consult with an attorney for any changes in the laws. Be certain to cross reference all applicable rules before preparing, filing or serving any papers!!! For example, Special Civil Part Rules often cross reference other rules – rules that apply to Special Civil Part Cases as well as to other types of civil cases not being heard in Special Civil Part.

NEW JERSEY THIRD PARTY BAD FAITH INSURANCE CLAIMS

WHAT IS THE NEW JERSEY DUTY OF GOOD FAITH AND FAIR DEALING IN NEW JERSEY INSURANCE CONTRACTS?
In addition to the express terms of a New Jersey insurance contract, the law provides that every New Jersey insurance contract contains an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. This means that, even though not specifically stated in the New Jersey insurance contract, it is implied or understood that the New Jersey insured and the New Jersey insurance company to the New Jersey insurance contract must act in good faith and deal fairly with the other party in performing or enforcing the terms of the New Jersey insurance contract.

WHAT IS A NEW JERSEY THIRD PARTY BAD FAITH INSURANCE CLAIM?
• A New Jersey third party bad faith insurance claim is brought by a New Jersey insured against its New Jersey insurance company based on the New Jersey insurance company's failure to settle a New Jersey third party tort claim for a reasonable sum for the New Jersey insured.
• In a New Jersey third party bad faith insurance case, the New Jersey insurance company is not a party to the underlying litigation against the New Jersey insured, and only after an excess verdict does the New Jersey insurance claim ripen by exposing the personal assets of the New Jersey insured, thus necessitating a new lawsuit regarding the bad faith allegations.
• The relationship of the New Jersey insurance company to its New Jersey insured regarding settlement is one of inherent fiduciary obligation.
• The obligation assumed by the New Jersey insurance company with respect to settlement is to exercise good faith in dealing with offers of compromise, having both the New Jersey insurance company’s and the New Jersey insured's interests in mind.
• The New Jersey insurance company has a fiduciary duty to act on behalf of the New Jersey insured when deciding not to settle an insurance claim within New Jersey insurance policy limits. The New Jersey insured’s decision not to settle the New Jersey insurance claim must be an honest one. It must result from a weighing of probabilities in a fair manner. To be a good faith decision, it must be an honest and intelligent one in the light of the New Jersey insurance company's expertise in the field. Where reasonable and probable cause appears for rejecting a settlement offer and for defending the damage action, the good faith of the New Jersey insurance company will be vindicated.
• The purpose of New Jersey liability insurance is to protect the New Jersey insured from liability within the limits of New Jersey insurance policy and the New Jersey insurance company cannot frustrate that purpose by a selfish decision exposing the New Jersey insured to and which results in a New Jersey judgment beyond New Jersey insurance policy limits.
• An insurance New Jersey insurance company owes a positive duty to its New Jersey insured to initiate and aggressively pursue all available avenues to settle the New Jersey insurance claim within New Jersey insurance policy's coverage limit. The New Jersey insurance company’s duty requires the New Jersey insurance company to attempt to negotiate a settlement within New Jersey insurance policy coverage.
• While the New Jersey insurance company is not compelled to disregard the New Jersey insurance company’s interests in representing or defending a New Jersey insured, the New Jersey insured's interests must necessarily come first.
• The New Jersey insurance company has a duty to investigate, in a timely and thorough fashion, the facts surrounding the New Jersey insurance claim, in order to be in the best position to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the New Jersey insurance claimant's case.
• The New Jersey insurance company must thereby make a reasonably diligent effort to ascertain the facts upon which a good faith judgment as to settlement can be formulated.
• Armed with this information, the New Jersey insurance company must thereafter engage in good faith discussions with the New Jersey insurance claimant, with the goal of settling the New Jersey insurance claim within New Jersey insurance policy's coverage limits.
• The New Jersey insurance company’s decision not to settle must:
o Be a thoroughly honest, intelligent and objective one in the light of the New Jersey insurance company's expertise in the field.
o Be a realistic one when tested by the necessarily assumed expertise of the New Jersey insurance company.
o Result from a weighing of probabilities in a fair manner.
• In third party bad faith cases, a New Jersey third party would sue the New Jersey insured for an amount exceeding the limits of the New Jersey insured's coverage and offer to settle for an amount equal to or less than those policy limits. At this point, the New Jersey insurance company would have no financial motive to accept the offer. By rejecting the offer, the New Jersey insurance company risked nothing more than the New Jersey insurance policy limits. By accepting it, the New Jersey insurance company would sacrifice the chance of winning at trial and owing the third party nothing. The basis of third party bad faith cases involve such settlement tactics by insurance companies.

HOW DOES A NEW JERSEY INSURANCE COMPANY COMMIT BAD FAITH WHEN HANDLING A NEW JERSEY INSURANCE CLAIM OR NEW JERSEY LAWSUIT BROUGHT BY A NEW JERSEY NEW JERSEY INSURED AGAINST A NEW JERSEY INSURED?
To act in good faith and deal fairly, a New Jersey insurance company must act in a way that is honest and faithful to the agreed purposes of the New Jersey insurance contract and consistent with the reasonable expectations of the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company. A New Jersey insurance company must not act in bad faith, dishonestly, or with improper motive to destroy or injure the right of the other party to receive the benefits or reasonable expectations of the New Jersey insurance contract. There can be no New Jersey breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing unless the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company have a New Jersey insurance contract. Additionally, the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing may not override an expressly granted right under the New Jersey insurance contract. For example, an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing may not override an express provision in the New Jersey insurance contract giving one party the right to terminate the New Jersey insurance contract and the party’s motive in terminating the New Jersey insurance contract under such circumstances may be irrelevant. A New Jersey insurance company must still, however, act in good faith in the performance of the New Jersey insurance contract until the termination actually takes place. Thus, even though the New Jersey insurance company complies with the express New Jersey insurance contract term entitling him to terminate the New Jersey insurance contract, the New Jersey insurance company may still be in breach of the New Jersey covenant of good faith and fair dealing if he fails to act in good faith and deal fairly until the New Jersey insurance contract is actually terminated. There are many forms of conduct that might constitute a violation of good faith and fair dealing, but each case is fact-sensitive. The New Jersey insurance company, as the dominant party, has an even greater obligation than the New Jersey insured to act in good faith; the New Jersey insurance company must not put technical encumbrances or hidden pitfalls in the way of New Jersey insureds that would undermine the New Jersey insureds’ reasonable expectations.

HOW DOES A NEW JERSEY INSURED PROVE A NEW JERSEY BAD FAITH INSURANCE LAWSUIT?
For a New Jersey court to find that there has been a New Jersey breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, the New Jersey insured must prove that the New Jersey insurance company, with no legitimate purpose: 1) acted with bad motives or intentions or engaged in deception or evasion in the performance of New Jersey insurance contract; and 2) by such conduct, denied the New Jersey insured of the bargain initially intended by the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company. To prevail on the New Jersey bad faith insurance lawsuit, the New Jersey insured must prove each of the following three elements by a preponderance of the evidence: First, the New Jersey insured must prove that some type of New Jersey insurance contract existed between the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company. There can be no breach of the New Jersey covenant of good faith and fair dealing unless the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company have a New Jersey insurance contract. Second, the New Jersey insured must prove that the New Jersey insurance company acted in bad faith with the purpose of depriving the New Jersey insured of rights or benefits under the New Jersey insurance contract. Third, the New Jersey insured must prove that the New Jersey insurance company’s conduct caused the New Jersey insured to suffer injury, damage, loss or harm.

WAS THERE A NEW JERSEY INSURANCE CONTRACT BETWEEN THE NEW JERSEY INSURED AND NEW JERSEY INSURANCE COMPANY?
The New Jersey court must first determine whether some type of New Jersey insurance contract existed between the New Jersey insured and the New Jersey insurance company. A New Jersey insurance contract may be expressed or implied or may be a mixture of the two. An express New Jersey insurance contract is one in which the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company have shown their agreement by words. Express New Jersey insurance contracts include those in which the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company have orally stated the terms to each other or have placed the terms in writing. An implied New Jersey insurance contract is one in which the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company show their agreement by conduct. For example, if someone provides services to another under circumstances that do not support the idea that they were donated or free, the law implies an obligation to pay the reasonable value of services. Thus, an implied New Jersey insurance contract is an agreement inferred from the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company’s conduct or from the circumstances surrounding their relationship. In other words, a New Jersey insurance company may be obligated to pay for services rendered for New Jersey insurance company by New Jersey insured if the circumstances are such that New Jersey insured reasonably expected New Jersey insurance company to compensate New Jersey insured and if a reasonable person in New Jersey insurance company’s position would know that New Jersey insured was performing the services expecting that New Jersey insurance company would pay for them.

DID THE NEW JERSEY INSURANCE COMPANY ACT IN BAD FAITH WITH THE INTENT TO DEPRIVE THE NEW JERSEY INSURED OF RIGHTS OR BENEFITS UNDER THE NEW JERSEY INSURANCE CONTRACT?
If the New Jersey insurance company finds that a New Jersey insurance contract existed between the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company, the New Jersey court must then determine whether the New Jersey insurance company violated the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. As to this element, the New Jersey court must decide whether the New Jersey insurance company acted with bad faith to interfere with the New Jersey insured’s right to receive the benefits of the New Jersey insurance contract. Proof of bad motive or intention is essential to a claim that the New Jersey insurance company has violated the New Jersey covenant of good faith and fair dealing.
In considering what constitutes bad faith, the New Jersey court should consider a number of factors, including the expectations of the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company and the purposes for which the New Jersey insurance contract was made. The New Jersey court should also consider the level of sophistication between the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company, whether the New Jersey insured and New Jersey insurance company had equal or unequal bargaining power, and whether the New Jersey insurance company’s action involved the exercise of discretion.
Keep in mind, however, that bad faith is not established by simply showing that the New Jersey insurance company’s motive for his/her actions did not consider the best interests of the New Jersey insured. New Jersey insurance contract law does not require parties to behave thoughtfully, charitably or unselfishly toward each other. In order for the New Jersey insured to prevail on his/her claim, the New Jersey court must specifically find that bad faith motivated the New Jersey insurance company’s actions. A New Jersey insurance company who acts in good faith on an honest, but mistaken, belief that the New Jersey insurance company’s actions were justified has not breached the New Jersey covenant of good faith and fair dealing.

DID THE NEW JERSEY INSURANCE COMPANY’S CONDUCT CAUSED THE NEW JERSEY INSURED TO SUFFER INJURY, DAMAGE, LOSS OR HARM? The New Jersey insured must also prove that because of the New Jersey insurance company’s actions, the New Jersey insured was unable to realize the benefits of the New Jersey insurance contract.

SUMMARY OF PROOFS REQUIRED TO WIN A NEW JERSEY BAD FAITH INSURANCE LAWSUIT
if the New Jersey insurance company finds that the New Jersey insured has proven by a preponderance of the evidence: (1) the existence of some type of New Jersey insurance contract; (2) that the New Jersey insurance company, although acting consistent with the New Jersey insurance contract’s terms, acted in bad faith with the intent to deprive the New Jersey insured of his/her reasonable expectations under the New Jersey insurance contract; and (3) the New Jersey insured sustained injury or loss as a result of such action, then the New Jersey court must find for the New Jersey insured.

IS THERE A RIGHT TO A JURY TRIAL IN A BAD FAITH INSURANCE CASE?
In one New Jersey insurance case decided by a New Jersey court, the New Jersey plaintiff, a mail carrier, filed the underlying personal injury action after she was attacked and seriously injured by the New Jersey insureds’ dog. The New Jersey plaintiff rejected the New Jersey insurance company’s $300,000 settlement offer, but the New Jersey plaintiff repeatedly asserted that the New Jersey plaintiff would have accepted a settlement near the $500,000 policy limits. The New Jersey plaintiff placed the New Jersey insurance company on notice that if she recovered a verdict in excess of the policy limits, she would look to the New Jersey insurance company for the excess. The trial resulted in a verdict in the New Jersey plaintiff’s favor in excess of the policy limits. The New Jersey insureds assigned their New Jersey insurance claim to the New Jersey plaintiff and she then brought a declaratory judgment lawsuit against the New Jersey insurance company. The New Jersey Supreme Court found that regardless of the label that the New Jersey plaintiff put on the New Jersey insurance lawsuit, the New Jersey bad faith insurance claim was a breach of New Jersey insurance contract claim and therefore, could be tried by a New Jersey jury.

THE BASIS FOR FINDING A NEW JERSEY INSURANCE COMPANY ENGAGED IN BAD FAITH IN FAILING TO SETTLE A NEW JERSEY THIRD PARTY NEW JERSEY INSURANCE CLAIM
• In a bad faith claim, the New Jersey insured must prove that defendant breached its insurance contract by its failure in bad faith to settle a personal injury suit brought against the New Jersey insured.
• It is the New Jersey insured's burden to "establish bad faith on the part of the New Jersey insurance company" in a separate trial.
• The ultimate question is not whether a verdict in excess of New Jersey insurance policy limits should have been anticipated but whether the New Jersey insurance company lacked good faith in deciding not to meet the settlement demand.
• Where reasonable and probable cause appears for rejecting a settlement offer and for defending the damage action, the good faith of the New Jersey insurance company will be vindicated.
• The first trial is the trial in which the New Jersey insured must prove bad faith by proving the existence of a proximate relationship between the New Jersey insured’s loss, in excess of New Jersey insurance policy limits and the manner in which the New Jersey insurance company handled settlement negotiations.
• Once the New Jersey insured establishes such bad faith, a prima facie case of damages for the difference between New Jersey insurance policy limit and the excess verdict has also been shown. It is then up to the New Jersey insurance company to demonstrate that settlement could not have been achieved within New Jersey insurance policy limit or for New Jersey insurance policy limit plus any amount the New Jersey insured would have been able and willing to contribute.
• The second trial requires the New Jersey insurance company to prove that the settlement could not have been achieved within New Jersey insurance policy limit or for New Jersey insurance policy limit plus any amount the New Jersey insured would have been able and willing to contribute.

WHAT DAMAGES CAN A NEW JERSEY INSURED RECOVER IN A NEW JERSEY THIRD PARTY BAD FAITH INSURANCE CLAIM?
• A New Jersey insured may recover more tha New Jersey insurance policy limit for a New Jersey liability insurance company's bad-faith refusal to settle a New Jersey third-party claim against its New Jersey insured within that limit, when the refusal results in the third party obtaining a New Jersey judgment against the New Jersey insured that exceeds New Jersey insurance policy limit.
• If the New Jersey insurance company breached its duty of good faith and fair dealing to the New Jersey insured, the New Jersey insurance company is liable to the New Jersey insured defendant for the entire New Jersey judgment and not just to the extent of New Jersey insurance policy limits.
• But a New Jersey insurance company is not strictly liable for any excess liability over a New Jersey insured's policy limits whenever it refuses to settle the New Jersey insurance claim.

NEED HELP WITH YOUR NEW JERSEY CASE?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case. Not all New Jersey cases require you to pay expensive legal fees to get legal help.

WHY SHOULD NEW JERSEY PRO SE PLAINTIFFS AND NEW JERSEY PRO SE DEFENDANTS SEEK HELP FROM A NEW JERSEY LAWYER?
Handling your New Jersey case wrong from the beginning may only cost you more money and time in the end!! Do it right the first time by seeking legal advice from a competent New Jersey lawyer!
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants make the mistake of not consulting a New Jersey lawyer before filing New Jersey Court papers only to later learn that the New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants made serious mistakes that could cause them to lose their New Jersey case. Let the Law Office of Paul DePetris help you with your New Jersey case.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT PERSONNEL FOR LEGAL ADVICE?
New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees. Most New Jersey Court employees are not trained New Jersey attorneys and therefore, they may not know what advice to give you. Working at the New Jersey Court as a non-judge is not the same as practicing law.

CAN I RELY ON NEW JERSEY COURT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE NEW JERSEY COURT?
The New Jersey Court usually provides certain types of New Jersey Court legal forms to the public and those forms are often very helpful. However, beware relying on New Jersey Court forms provided by the New Jersey Court – the New Jersey Court forms are often deceptively simple, while New Jersey cases often are much more complex than they first appear to be. There is simply no substitute for a competent New Jersey attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey who has experience handling New Jersey cases. New Jersey Court forms don’t talk and New Jersey Court forms and their directions rarely, if ever, cover every possible situation, set of facts or legal issue that may arise in a New Jersey case. Each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges. If you can afford a competent New Jersey attorney, it is best to have the New Jersey attorney prepare your New Jersey Court paperwork for you.

CAN I HANDLE A NEW JERSEY CASE MYSELF?
Many New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants can and do successfully handle New Jersey cases, from filing the first paperwork to the collection of a New Jersey Court judgment. However, many other New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants also make mistakes that lead to the dismissal of their New Jersey cases or that result in the entry of a New Jersey Court money judgment against them. The greater the money at stake, the greater the reason to consider using the services of a competent attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey to handle part or all of the New Jersey case. The following are reasons to use an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case:
• New Jersey Court fees often change
• New Jersey Court rules often change
• New Jersey Court employees cannot give you “free” legal advice and a New Jersey Court judge may refuse to let you claim that you were right in taking an action (or in deciding not to take action) because you relied on advice from such employees
• New Jersey Court forms available on websites may not cover every situation you may face in Court
• each New Jersey case has its own particular legal issues and therefore, its own challenges
• it is very common for New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants to file inadequate or incorrect New Jersey Court complaints that result in the New Jersey Court complaints or answers to New Jersey Court complaints being rejected by the New Jersey Court or being dismissed by the New Jersey Court after filing and before or after trial because of procedural deficiencies.
• it is not uncommon for judges to get very frustrated by an unrepresented party’s lack of preparation or ignorance of the facts or law of the New Jersey case.
• a Court has the power to punish unprepared New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants, such as by throwing their New Jersey case out of Court or limiting what they can present at the New Jersey Court trial.
• New Jersey has many published cases, laws, regulations, Court rules and rules of evidence that can be very tricky to understand and that can be used to prevent you from doing much of what you want to do at the New Jersey Court trial.
• it is very common for Courts to refuse to allow a party to use or refer to documents or items at the New Jersey Court trial that the person themselves never prepared. Often New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants stumble into New Jersey Court with a video, photograph, bill or affidavit or other form of written statement, thinking they are going to use it as proof that they lost money or that they are not responsible for someone else’s damages, only to have a New Jersey Court judge tell the New Jersey plaintiffs and New Jersey defendants that it is not going to even consider such items or documents.
• without the proper preparation, items and documents may never be considered by the New Jersey Court. Also, if there are any legal issues to be dealt with at the New Jersey Court trial, you must be prepared to argue them, which may require you to refer to Court rules, evidence rules, laws, regulations or published cases.
• you cannot show up at the New Jersey Court expecting the judge hearing your New Jersey case to explain Court rules, evidence rules, Court procedure or the details of the law that applies to your New Jersey case. The judge hearing your New Jersey case is not permitted to give you legal advice.

It is important to remember that even if you have an attorney, you could lose your New Jersey case. Hiring an attorney to handle part or all of your New Jersey case does not guarantee your success. However, it may provide what is needed to win your New Jersey case or to avoid certain mistakes.

DOES THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HAVE EXPERIENCE HANDLING NEW JERSEY CASES?
Yes. Paul DePetris has performed the following tasks:
• handled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey, from Bergen County New Jersey to Cumberland County New Jersey, including representations of individuals, small businesses and large corporations.
• settled New Jersey cases for plaintiffs and defendants across New Jersey.
• reviewed many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• enforced many New Jersey Court settlement agreements.
• provided New Jersey pro se plaintiffs and New Jersey pro se defendants with New Jersey Court legal advice and prepared New Jersey Court legal forms
• prepared and filed many New Jersey Court complaints
• tried New Jersey Court jury trials
• mediated many New Jersey cases
• argued New Jersey Court motions
• handled New Jersey Court proof hearings
• handled New Jersey Court post judgment collection proceedings

Mr. DePetris has appeared before the Superior Court of New Jersey in the following counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

IN WHAT NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WILL THE LAW OFFICE OF PAUL DEPETRIS HANDLE NEW JERSEY CASES?
The Law Office of Paul DePetris offers to handle and help individuals and businesses with New Jersey Court Claims cases in North, Central and Southern New Jersey, including cases in the following New Jersey counties:
• Atlantic County New Jersey Court
• Bergen County New Jersey Court
• Burlington County New Jersey Court
• Camden County New Jersey Court
• Cape May County New Jersey Court
• Cumberland County New Jersey Court
• Essex County New Jersey Court
• Gloucester County New Jersey Court
• Hudson County New Jersey Court
• Mercer County New Jersey Court
• Middlesex County New Jersey Court
• Monmouth County New Jersey Court
• Morris County New Jersey Court
• Ocean County New Jersey Court
• Passaic County New Jersey Court
• Salem County New Jersey Court
• Somerset County New Jersey Court
• Sussex County New Jersey Court
• Union County New Jersey Court
• Warren County New Jersey Court

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY TO HANDLE MY NEW JERSEY CASE FROM BEGINNING TO END?
In many situations, the Law Office of Paul DePetris offers alternatives to handling New Jersey cases for an hourly fee, such as by offering to handle your New Jersey case up to trial for a fixed fee or to help you handle your New Jersey case by yourself. Such flexible methods may allow you to keep the amount legal fees you spend on your New Jersey case to a fixed sum, while providing you the help you need to handle your New Jersey case. For a no obligation phone consultation about what the Firm might be able to do for you, call Mr. DePetris at 609-714-2020 or send an email to Mr. DePetris. 
 

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